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Eva H. Telzer
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
127Publications
31H-index
3,543Citations
Publications 127
Newest
Published in Psychoneuroendocrinology 4.01
Grant S. Shields12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Susannah L Ivory1
Estimated H-index: 1
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Eva H. Telzer31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Abstract Prior studies have established that cortisol and testosterone play a role in impulsive behavior, but little is known about how cumulative exposure to these hormones over a recent period influences cognitive processes that help to regulate impulsive behavior. We addressed this gap in the present study by examining how hair concentrations of testosterone and cortisol related to response inhibition and risky decision-making in adolescents. Adolescents provided 3 cm of hair cut as close as ...
Published on Jul 17, 2019in Child Development Perspectives 4.43
Emma Armstrong-Carter (Stanford University), Elizabeth Olson14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
Eva H. Telzer31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Published on Jul 10, 2019in Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience 2.66
Michael T. Perino (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis), João F. Guassi Moreira4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles),
Eva H. Telzer31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Neuroscientists who have studied bullying have primarily focused on the psychopathology of diagnosable offenders or the resulting symptomatology of victimization. Less attention has been given to theories that suggest that bullying may be an interpersonal strategy. In an exploratory study, we recruited a sample of adolescents (N = 24) who engaged in high rates of delinquent behavior and collected self-report ratings of bullying behaviors. During an fMRI scan, adolescents observed instances of so...
Bridget L. Callaghan17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Columbia University),
Dylan G. Gee23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Yale University)
+ 9 AuthorsDaniel S. Lumian7
Estimated H-index: 7
(DU: University of Denver)
Abstract Background The human brain remains highly plastic for a protracted developmental period. Thus, although early caregiving adversities that alter amygdala development can result in enduring emotion regulation difficulties, these trajectories should respond to subsequent enriched caregiving. Exposure to high-quality parenting can regulate (i.e., decrease) children’s amygdala reactivity, a process that, over the long term, is hypothesized to enhance emotion regulation. We tested the hypothe...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews 8.00
Jorien van Hoorn4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
Holly Shablack7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
+ 1 AuthorsEva H. Telzer31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Abstract Neurobiological models of adolescent decision-making emphasize developmental changes in brain regions involved in affect (e.g., ventral striatum) and cognitive control (e.g., lateral prefrontal cortex). Although social context plays an important role in adolescent decision-making, current models do not discuss brain regions implicated in processing social information (e.g., dorsomedial prefrontal cortex). We conducted a coordinate-based meta-analysis using the Multilevel peak Kernel Den...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience 4.92
Kathy T. Do2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Eva H. Telzer31
Estimated H-index: 31
Abstract Although prosocial behavior is preferentially directed toward the in-group across many species, prioritizing the outcomes of both the in- and out-group earlier in development can reduce intergroup biases. The current study examined the role of corticostriatal recruitment and connectivity in buffering the effect of intergroup bias on costly giving behavior during childhood and adolescence, a period when other-oriented preferences and associated brain functions undergo significant change....
Published on May 29, 2019in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.87
Yang Qu8
Estimated H-index: 8
(NU: Northwestern University),
Lynda C. Lin2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Eva H. Telzer31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Most research on cultural neuroscience focuses on one dimension of culture: group membership or individual orientation. However, it is especially important to examine the intersection between the two to better understand the acculturation process. To examine the role of culture in the neural correlates of risky exploration, the current study recruited 22 American and 24 Chinese international students. Participants reported on their independent self-construal, a measure defining the self in terms...
Published on Apr 7, 2019in Journal of Research on Adolescence 2.07
Christina R. Rogers2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
Michael T. Perino2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UW: University of Washington),
Eva H. Telzer31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
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