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Eva H. Telzer
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
137Publications
33H-index
3,985Citations
Publications 139
Newest
Decades of developmental research have demonstrated the positive role of parental monitoring during adolescence, a time during which youth seek exploration and show heightened risk taking. The present study employed a novel neural pattern similarity approach to identify neural patterns underpinning parental monitoring, with attention to implications for adolescent risk taking. Mothers (N = 23) underwent an fMRI scan during which they completed a risk-taking task and viewed the risk-taking behavi...
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#1Grant S. Shields (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 13
#2Susannah L. Ivory (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 2
Last.Eva H. Telzer (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 33
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Abstract Prior studies have established that cortisol and testosterone play a role in impulsive behavior, but little is known about how cumulative exposure to these hormones over a recent period influences cognitive processes that help to regulate impulsive behavior. We addressed this gap in the present study by examining how hair concentrations of testosterone and cortisol related to response inhibition and risky decision-making in adolescents. Adolescents provided 3 cm of hair cut as close as ...
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#1Ethan M. McCormick (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 5
#2Nancy L. McElwain (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 19
Last.Eva H. Telzer (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 33
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Abstract Early experiences have the potential for outsized influence on neural development across a wide number of domains. In humans, many of the most important such experiences take place in the context of the mother-child attachment relationship. Work from animal models has highlighted neural changes in dopaminergic systems as a function of early care experiences, but translational research in humans has been limited. Our goal was to fill this gap by examining the longitudinal associations be...
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2 CitationsSource
#1Michael T. Perino (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)H-Index: 3
#2João F. Guassi Moreira (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 4
Last.Eva H. Telzer (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 33
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#1Emma Armstrong‐Carter (Stanford University)H-Index: 1
#2Elizabeth Olson (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 14
Last.Eva H. Telzer (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 33
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#1Neeltje E. Blankenstein (LEI: Leiden University)H-Index: 5
#2Eva H. Telzer (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 33
Last.Eveline A. Crone (LEI: Leiden University)H-Index: 53
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#1Seh-Joo Kwon (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
#2Susannah L. Ivory (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 2
Last.Eva H. Telzer (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 33
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Adolescence is a time of unique sensitivity to socially salient stimuli such as social rewards. This period overlaps with the onset of psychopathology such as internalizing and externalizing symptoms. In the current studies, we examined behavioral and neural patterns of dysregulation to social rewards and threats, and links to internalizing and externalizing symptoms in youths. In study 1, we used a social Go/NoGo cognitive control task using peer faces to test for age-related behavioral differe...
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