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Hazel Christie
University of Edinburgh
32Publications
16H-index
1,086Citations
Publications 32
Newest
#1Hazel Christie (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 16
#2Nina Morris (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 3
ABSTRACTIn this paper, we investigate the powerful role of blogging to promote student engagement. We use the experience of students on four courses at one university, which all included blogging i...
#1Nina Morris (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 3
#2Hazel Christie (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 16
Last.Jacob Barber (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)
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#1Hazel Christie (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 16
#2Viviene E. Cree (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 18
Last.Lyn Tett (University of Huddersfield)H-Index: 19
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ABSTRACTThere is a substantial body of quantitative evidence about the benefits of higher education. However there is little qualitative evidence about the extent to which these benefits accrue to graduates from non-traditional backgrounds. This paper contributes to this gap in knowledge by exploring the experiences of a group of 15 graduates 10 years after they had started at university. The cohort was unusual because they had all completed a college-level qualification before going on to study...
#1Lyn Tett (University of Huddersfield)H-Index: 19
#2Viviene E. Cree (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 18
Last.Hazel Christie (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 16
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AbstractThis paper addresses a central paradox that affects the nature of the student experience in the U.K. On the one hand, the marketisation of higher education, with its associated emphasis on performativity indicators, may be seen to have reduced students to numbers, with the attendant consequence that the affective domain of studying and learning has been lost. On the other hand, there is more attention given to student feelings than was ever the case in the past and questions about studen...
#1Lyn Tett (University of Huddersfield)H-Index: 19
#2Viviene E. Cree (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 18
Last.Hazel Christie (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 16
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This paper argues that transition is not a one-off event that occurs when students first enter universities but is an on-going process that is repeated over time. We draw on qualitative data from a longitudinal project on “non-traditional” students who entered a research-intensive university in Scotland direct from further education colleges. This cohort of 45 was asked about their views on college and university learning in a study that was conducted throughout their time at university; a sub-s...
#1Hazel ChristieH-Index: 16
#2Lyn Tett (University of Huddersfield)H-Index: 19
Last.Velda McCuneH-Index: 16
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This paper explores the transitions that a group of students, admitted from further education colleges as part of broader widening access initiative at a Scottish research-intensive university, made across the lifetime of their degrees. It investigates how they negotiate their learning careers beyond the first year, and how they (re)define their approaches to independent learning as they progress to the later years of their courses. Evidence is drawn from 20 students who were interviewed during ...
#1Viviene E. CreeH-Index: 18
#2Hazel ChristieH-Index: 16
Last.Evelyn TettH-Index: 1
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It is widely acknowledged that higher education in the UK is under pressure. As successive government’s policies have reinforced the idea that higher education is a market like any other, with students as consumers of packages of education, so the pedagogical relationships upon which education have been centred are stretched to breaking-point. But are relationships between staff and students really in jeopardy? This article will report on a longitudinal study of the experiences of students who e...
In response to widespread support for mentoring schemes in higher education this article calls for a more critical investigation of the dynamics of power and control, which are intrinsic to the mentoring process, and questions presumptions that mentoring brings only positive benefits to its participants. It provides this more critical appraisal by using evidence from a mentoring project at one university in the UK. Attention is drawn to three keys issues: first, to the highly formalised nature o...
#1Hazel Christie (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 16
#2Daphne Loads (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 6
Orientation, the process of easing the transition of university educators into their new roles and contexts, is a challenging aspect of academic development. In this paper, we share our experiences of redesigning an orientation event for academic colleagues teaching in a research-intensive university. Over a number of years, our well-established orientation had come to rely on a transmission model of learning and feedback from participants suggested dissatisfaction with this format. We aimed to ...
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