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Kevin Matthews
University of Iowa
10Publications
6H-index
120Citations
Publications 10
Newest
#1Kevin MatthewsH-Index: 6
#2Wei Xu (UWM: University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee)H-Index: 1
Last.Lisa C. McGuireH-Index: 25
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Introduction Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD) cause a high burden of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Age, race, and ethnicity are important risk factors for ADRD. Methods We estimated the future US burden of ADRD by age, sex, and race and ethnicity by applying subgroup-specific prevalence among Medicare Fee-for-Service beneficiaries aged ≥65 years in 2014 to subgroup-specific population estimates for 2014 and population projection data from the United State...
19 CitationsSource
#1Kevin MatthewsH-Index: 6
#2Janet B. CroftH-Index: 71
Last.Wayne H. GilesH-Index: 9
view all 12 authors...
Persons living in rural areas are recognized as a health disparity population because the prevalence of disease and rate of premature death are higher than for the overall population of the United States. Surveillance data about health-related behaviors are rarely reported by urban-rural status, which makes comparisons difficult among persons living in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan counties.
39 CitationsSource
#1Mary E. Charlton (UI: University of Iowa)H-Index: 15
#2Kevin Matthews (UI: University of Iowa)H-Index: 6
Last.Barcey T. Levy (UI: University of Iowa)H-Index: 22
view all 7 authors...
Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening has been shown to decrease the incidence of late-stage colorectal cancer, yet a substantial proportion of Americans do not receive screening. Those in rural areas may face barriers to colonoscopy services based on travel time, and previous studies have demonstrated lower screening among rural residents. Our purpose was to assess factors associated with late-stage CRC, and specifically to determine if longer travel time to colonoscopy was associated wi...
5 CitationsSource
#1Mary E. CharltonH-Index: 15
#2Kevin MatthewsH-Index: 6
Last.Barcey T. LevyH-Index: 22
view all 7 authors...
Source
#1Mary E. CharltonH-Index: 15
#2Kevin MatthewsH-Index: 6
Last.Barcey T. LevyH-Index: 22
view all 7 authors...
Source
#1Kirsten M. M. Beyer (MCW: Medical College of Wisconsin)H-Index: 13
#2Yuhong Zhou (MCW: Medical College of Wisconsin)H-Index: 3
Last.Ann B. Nattinger (MCW: Medical College of Wisconsin)H-Index: 37
view all 6 authors...
Racial health disparities continue to be a serious problem in the United States and have been linked to contextual factors, including racial segregation. In some cases, including breast cancer survival, racial disparities appear to be worsening. Using the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) database, we extend current spatial analysis methodology to derive new, spatially continuous indices of (1) racial bias in mortgage lending and (2) redlining. We then examine spatial patterns of these indices...
14 CitationsSource
Cancer health disparities by race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and geography are a top public health priority. Breast and colorectal cancer, in particular, have been shown to exhibit significant disparities and contribute a large proportion of morbidity and mortality from cancer. In addition, breast and colorectal cancer offer targets for prevention and control, including nutrition, physical activity, screening, and effective treatments to prolong and enhance the quality of survival. Howeve...
5 Citations
#1Marcia M. WardH-Index: 33
#2Fred UllrichH-Index: 9
Last.Charles F. LynchH-Index: 82
view all 12 authors...
The authors examine access issues in Iowa and determine a methodology for conducting a national analysis.
10 CitationsSource
#1Marcia M. WardH-Index: 33
#2Fred UllrichH-Index: 9
Last.Charles F. LynchH-Index: 82
view all 11 authors...
Access to cancer care is dependent on the absolute number of providers, but it is also dependent on their geographic distribution.
10 CitationsSource
#1Marcia M. WardH-Index: 33
#2Fred UllrichH-Index: 9
Last.Charles F. LynchH-Index: 82
view all 8 authors...
The rate of nontreatment varies by cancer type and stage and is higher in patients receiving initial recommendations in nonaccredited cancer programs than in accredited cancer programs.
18 CitationsSource
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