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Nicolas Guilpart
Agro ParisTech
13Publications
6H-index
165Citations
Publications 13
Newest
#1J.G.B. LeenaarsH-Index: 9
#2L. Claessens (ICRISAT: International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics)H-Index: 20
Last.Kenneth G. Cassman (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 67
view all 9 authors...
Abstract In rainfed crop production, root zone plant-available water holding capacity (RZ-PAWHC) of the soil has a large influence on crop growth and the yield response to management inputs such as improved seeds and fertilisers. However, data are lacking for this parameter in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). This study produced the first spatially explicit, coherent and complete maps of the rootable depth and RZ-PAWHC of soil in SSA. We compiled geo-referenced data from 28,000 soil profiles from SSA, ...
#1Nicolas Guilpart (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 6
#2Patricio Grassini (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 21
Last.Kenneth G. Cassman (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 67
view all 10 authors...
There is a persistent narrative about the potential of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) to be a 'grain breadbasket' because of large gaps between current low yields and yield potential with good management, and vast land resources with adequate rainfall. However, rigorous evaluation of the extent to which soils can support high, stable yields has been limited by lack of data on rootable soil depth of sufficient quality and spatial resolution. Here we use location-specific climate data, a robust spatial ...
#1Nicolas Guilpart (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 6
#2Patricio Grassini (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 21
Last.Kenneth G. Cassman (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 67
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Yield gap analyses of individual crops have been used to estimate opportunities for increasing crop production at local to global scales, thus providing information crucial to food security. However, increases in crop production can also be achieved by improving cropping system yield through modification of spatial and temporal arrangement of individual crops. In this paper we define the cropping system yield potential as the output from the combination of crops that gives the highest e...
#1Hugo de GrootH-Index: 4
#2Ochieng Adimo (JKUAT: Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology)H-Index: 1
Last.Kenneth G. Cassman (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 67
view all 13 authors...
The Global Yield Gap Atlas project (GYGA - http://yieldgap.org) has undertaken a yield gap assessment following the protocol recommended by van Ittersum et al. (2013). One part of the activities consists of collecting and processing weather data as an input for crop simulation models in sub-Saharan African countries including Kenya. This publication covers daily weather data for 12 locations in Kenya for the years 1998-2012. The project looked for good quality weather data in areas where crops a...
view all 28 authors...
By the year 2050, the world’s population will need 60% more food than it did in 2005. In sub-Saharan Africa (we’ll call it SSA) (Fig. 1) this problem will be even greater, with the demand for cereals increasing by more than three times as the population rises. We collected and calculated farming data for 10 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. This made us realize that countries in SSA must make many large changes to ncrease their yield of cereals (the amount of cereals that are grown on the current...
#1Martin K. van Ittersum (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 45
#2Lenny G.J. van Bussel (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 12
Last.Kenneth G. Cassman (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 67
view all 26 authors...
Although global food demand is expected to increase 60% by 2050 compared with 2005/2007, the rise will be much greater in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Indeed, SSA is the region at greatest food security risk because by 2050 its population will increase 2.5-fold and demand for cereals approximately triple, whereas current levels of cereal consumption already depend on substantial imports. At issue is whether SSA can meet this vast increase in cereal demand without greater reliance on cereal imports ...
#1J. Timsina (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 26
#2J. Wolf (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 30
Last.Martin K. van Ittersum (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 45
view all 10 authors...
Bangladesh faces huge challenges in achieving food security due to its high population, diet changes, and limited room for expanding cropland and cropping intensity. The objective of this study is to assess the degree to which Bangladesh can be self-sufficient in terms of domestic maize, rice and wheat production by the years 2030 and 2050 by closing the existing gap (Yg) between yield potential (Yp) and actual farm yield (Ya), accounting for possible changes in cropland area. Yield potential an...
#1Matthew B. Espe (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 5
#2Kenneth G. Cassman (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 67
Last.Bruce A. Linquist (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 27
view all 14 authors...
Abstract Many assessments of crop yield gaps based on comparisons to actual yields suggest grain yields in highly intensified agricultural systems are at or near the maximum yield attainable. However, these estimates can be biased in situations where yields are below full yield potential. Rice yields in the US continue to increase annually, suggesting that rice yields are not near the potential. In the interest of directing future efforts towards areas where improvement is most easily achieved, ...
#1Matthew B. Espe (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 5
#2Haishun Yang (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 23
Last.Bruce A. Linquist (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 27
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Accurate estimation of a crop’s yield potential (Yp) is critical to addressing long-term food security via identification of the exploitable yield gap. Due to lack of field data, efforts to quantify crop yield potential typically rely on crop models. Using the ORYZA rice crop model, we sought to estimate Yp of irrigated rice for two widely used rice varieties (M-206 and CXL745) in three major US rice-producing regions that together represent some of the highest yielding rice regions of ...
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