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Tarah N. Sullivan
University of California, San Diego
7Publications
2H-index
26Citations
Publications 7
Newest
#1Tarah N. Sullivan (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 2
#2Tzu-Tying Hung (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)
Last.Marc A. Meyers (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
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Abstract Avian flight feathers have developed, through evolution, an intricate architecture with multi-functional structures that are essential for flight. These lightweight and resilient appendages motivate the invention of bioinspired designs. Here we fabricate various structures inspired by significant concepts identified in the feather vane and shaft. Bioinspired prototypes based on the feather vane's unique adhesive mechanism and directional permeability are explored, and feather-shaft insp...
#1Bin Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 7
#2Tarah N. Sullivan (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 2
Last.Marc A. Meyers (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
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#1Tarah N. Sullivan (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 2
#2Marc A. Meyers (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
Last.E. Arzt (Saarland University)
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Aves are an incredibly diverse class of animals, ranging greatly in size and thriving in a wide variety of environments. Here, we explore the scaling trends of bird wings in connection with their flight performance. The tensile strength of avian bone is hypothesized to be a limiting factor in scaling the humerus with mass, which is corroborated by its experimentally determined allometric scaling trend. We provide a mechanics analysis that explains the scaling allometry of the wing humerus length...
#1Tarah N. Sullivan (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 2
#2Yunlan Zhang (Purdue University)
Last.Marc A. Meyers (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
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#1Bin Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 7
#2Tarah N. Sullivan (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 2
Abstract Keratinous materials, omnipresent as the hard and durable epidermal appendages of animals, are among the toughest biological materials. They exhibit diverse morphologies and structures that serve a variety of amazing and inspiring mechanical functions. In this work, we provide a review of representative terrestrial, aerial and aquatic keratinous materials, pangolin scales, feather shafts and baleen plates, and correlate their hierarchical structures to the respective functions of dermal...
#1Tarah N. Sullivan (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 2
#2Michael Chon (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 1
Last.Marc A. Meyers (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
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In bird flight, the majority of the wing surface consists of highly refined and hierarchically organized feathers. They are composed of barbs that stem from the feather shaft and barbules that branch from barbs, forming a rigid feather vane. Barbules provide adhesion within the vane through an interlocking hook-and-groove mechanism to allow for the effective capture of air. This functional adhesive can reattach if structures unfasten from one another, preventing catastrophic damage of the vane. ...
#1Tarah N. Sullivan (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 2
#2Bin Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 7
Last.Marc A. Meyers (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
view all 4 authors...
Flight is not the exclusive domain of birds; mammals (bats), insects, and some fish have independently developed this ability by the process of convergent evolution. Birds, however, greatly outperform other flying animals in efficiency and duration; for example the common swift ( Apus apus ) has recently been reported to regularly fly for periods of 10 months during migration. Birds owe this extraordinary capability to feathers and bones, which are extreme lightweight biological materials. They ...
#1Tarah N. Sullivan (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 2
#2Andrei Pissarenko (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 2
Last.Marc A. Meyers (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 69
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Abstract The flying feathers of birds are keratinous appendages designed for maximum performance with a minimum weight penalty. Thus, their design contains ingenious combinations of components that optimize lift, stiffness, aerodynamics, and damage resistance. This design involves two main parts: a central shaft that prescribes stiffness and lateral vanes which allows for the capture of air. Within the feather vane, barbs branch from the shaft and barbules branch from barbs, forming a flat surfa...
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