Match!
W. Christopher Carleton
Simon Fraser University
Radiocarbon datingGeomorphologyGeologyClimate changeClimatology
7Publications
3H-index
24Citations
What is this?
Publications 8
Newest
#1W. Christopher Carleton (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 3
#2Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
ABSTRACTWe report a study in which we systematically reviewed the recent literature dealing with human-environment interaction in prehistory. We first identified the 165 most highly cited papers pu...
4 CitationsSource
#1W. Christopher Carleton (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 3
#2Brea McCauley (SFU: Simon Fraser University)
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
view all 4 authors...
ABSTRACTAncient monuments are puzzling from an evolutionary perspective. It is obvious that their construction would have been costly in terms of energy, but it is not clear how they would have enh...
Source
Last. Mark CollardH-Index: 33
view all 4 authors...
#1W. Christopher Carleton (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 3
#2David A. Campbell (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 10
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Cycles are widely considered to be an important feature of environmental and human history over the last 50,000 years. However, there is an overlooked problem in the investigation of cyclicity in this time period—the standard statistical methods for identifying cycles assume that observations are precisely dated, but the main relevant dating technique, radiocarbon dating, often yields dates with large and highly irregular uncertainties. Here, we present the results of a massive simulati...
1 CitationsSource
#1W. Christopher Carleton (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 3
#2David A. Campbell (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 10
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
view all 3 authors...
Statistical time-series analysis has the potential to improve our understanding of human-environment interaction in deep time. However, radiocarbon dating—the most common chronometric technique in archaeological and palaeoenvironmental research—creates challenges for established statistical methods. The methods assume that observations in a time-series are precisely dated, but this assumption is often violated when calibrated radiocarbon dates are used because they usually have highly irregular ...
1 CitationsSource
#1W. Christopher Carleton (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 3
#2David A. Campbell (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 10
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
view all 3 authors...
Abstract The impact of climate change on conflict is an important but controversial topic. One issue that needs to be resolved is whether or not climate change exacerbates conflict over the long term. With this in mind, we investigated the relationship between climate change and conflict among Classic Maya polities over a period of several hundred years (363–888 CE). We compiled a list of conflicts recorded on dated monuments, and then located published temperature and rainfall records for the r...
5 CitationsSource
#1W. Christopher Carleton (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 3
#2Kong F. Cheong (AU: American University)H-Index: 1
Last. Gyles Iannone (Trent University)H-Index: 10
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Extensive archaeological surveys are critical for understanding past human-landscape interaction, but they are frequently impeded by access difficulties, rugged terrain, or obscurant vegetation. These challenges can make extensive surveys prohibitively costly and time-consuming. Consequently, many archaeologists are interested in predictive techniques—i.e., methods that can estimate the potential for a given region to contain archaeological remains. Predictive techniques can reduce the ...
2 CitationsSource
#1W. Christopher Carleton (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 3
#2David A. Campbell (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 10
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 16
view all 3 authors...
Abstract The study reported here challenges the widely discussed hypothesis that cyclical droughts had a major impact on the Classic Maya. This hypothesis was developed by Hodell et al. (2001, 2005) on the basis of the results of time series analyses of cores from Lake Chichancanab in the Yucatan peninsula. Hodell et al.'s analyses indicated that the Maya region was affected by two drought cycles during the 1st millennium CE, one with a periodicity of 208 years and another with a periodicity of ...
11 CitationsSource
1