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Benjamin J. Feinberg
University of California, San Francisco
Analytical chemistryNanoporeExtracorporeal membrane oxygenationPolydimethylsiloxaneMembrane
5Publications
3H-index
23Citations
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Publications 5
Newest
#1Emily Abada (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 2
#2Benjamin J. Feinberg (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 3
Last. Shuvo Roy (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 32
view all 3 authors...
While extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a valuable therapy for patients with lung or heart failure, clinical use of ECMO remains limited due to hemocompatibility concerns with pro-coagulatory hollow fiber membrane geometries. Previously, we demonstrated the feasibility of silicon nanopore (SNM) and micropore (SμM) membranes for transport between two liquid-phase compartments in blood-contacting devices. Herein, we investigate various pore sizes of SNM and SμM membranes – alone or wit...
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#1Ajay Dharia (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 1
#2Emily Abada (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 2
Last. Shuvo Roy (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 32
view all 10 authors...
Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life support system that circulates the blood through an oxygenating system to temporarily (days to months) support heart or lung function during cardiopulmonary failure until organ recovery or replacement. Currently, the need for high levels of systemic anticoagulation and the risk for bleeding are main drawbacks of ECMO that can be addressed with a redesigned ECMO system. Our lab has developed an approach using microelectromechanical systems (MEM...
3 CitationsSource
#1Benjamin J. Feinberg (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 3
#2Jeff C. Hsiao (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 1
Last. Shuvo Roy (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 32
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have enabled the fabrication of silicon nanopore membranes (SNM) with uniform non-overlapping “slit shaped” pores. The application of SNM has been suggested for high selectivity of biomolecules in a variety of medical filtration applications. The aim of this study was to rigorously quantify the differences in sieving between slit pore SNM and more commonly modeled cylindrical pore membranes, including effects of the extended Derjaguin, Landau, Verwe...
1 CitationsSource
#1Benjamin J. Feinberg (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 3
#2Jeff C. Hsiao (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 1
Last. Shuvo Roy (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 32
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), a technology that resulted from significant innovation in semiconductor fabrication, have recently been applied to the development of silicon nanopore membranes (SNM). In contrast to membranes fabricated from polymeric materials, SNM exhibit slit-shaped pores, monodisperse pore size, constant surface porosity, zero pore overlap, and sub-micron thickness. This development in membrane fabrication is applied herein for the validation of the XDLVO (ext...
6 CitationsSource
#1Steven Kim (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 3
#2Benjamin J. Feinberg (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 3
Last. Shuvo Roy (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 32
view all 14 authors...
Hemodialysis using hollow-fiber membranes provides life-sustaining treatment for nearly 2 million patients worldwide with end stage renal disease (ESRD). However, patients on hemodialysis have worse long-term outcomes compared to kidney transplant or other chronic illnesses. Additionally, the underlying membrane technology of polymer hollow-fiber membranes has not fundamentally changed in over four decades. Therefore, we have proposed a fundamentally different approach using microelectromechanic...
13 CitationsSource
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