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Catherine G. Herrington
Vanderbilt University
3Publications
1H-index
7Citations
Publications 3
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 2.98
John Garber124
Estimated H-index: 124
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University),
Sherryl H. Goodman43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Emory University)
+ 2 AuthorsCatherine G. Herrington1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
Abstract Feedback that young children receive from others can affect their emotions and emerging self-views. The current experiment tested the effect of negative content (criticism) and negative tone (hostile) of the feedback on children’s affect, self-evaluations, and attributions. We also explored whether maternal history of depression and children’s temperament moderated these relations. Participants were 152 mothers and children (48% girls) aged 4 and 5 years ( M = 61.6 months, SD = 6.83). T...
Published on Aug 1, 2018in Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 2.79
Jeffrey F. Hine (Vandy: Vanderbilt University), Catherine G. Herrington1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
+ 4 AuthorsZachary Warren24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
Long waits for diagnostic assessment prevent early identification of children suspected of having autism spectrum disorder. We evaluated the benefit of embedded diagnostic consultation within primary care clinics. Using a streamlined diagnostic model, 119 children with concerns for autism spectrum disorder were seen over 14 months. Diagnostic clarity was determined through streamlined assessment for 59% of the children, while others required follow-up. Latency from first concern to diagnosis was...
Published on Mar 28, 2016in Annual Review of Clinical Psychology 14.10
John Garber124
Estimated H-index: 124
,
Sarah A. Frankel3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Catherine G. Herrington1
Estimated H-index: 1
Although some treatments for depression in children and adolescents have been found to be efficacious, the effects sizes have tended to be modest. Thus, there is considerable room to improve upon existing depression treatments. Some children may respond poorly because they do not yet have the cognitive, social, or emotional maturity needed to understand and apply the skills being taught in therapy. Therefore, treatments for depression may need to be tailored to match children's ability to both c...
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