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I-Shuo Huang
Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi
6Publications
3H-index
19Citations
Publications 6
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Harmful Algae 5.01
I-Shuo Huang3
Estimated H-index: 3
(A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi),
Paul V. Zimba27
Estimated H-index: 27
(A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi)
Abstract Cyanobacterial blooms occur when algal densities exceed baseline population concentrations. Cyanobacteria can produce a large number of secondary metabolites. Odorous metabolites affect the smell and flavor of aquatic animals, whereas bioactive metabolites cause a range of lethal and sub-lethal effects in plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates, including humans. Herein, the bioactivity, chemistry, origin, and biosynthesis of these cyanobacterial secondary metabolites were reviewed. With...
Published on Feb 13, 2019in Journal of Phycology 2.83
Sergei Shalygin (A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi), I-Shuo Huang3
Estimated H-index: 3
(A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi)
+ 2 AuthorsPaul V. Zimba27
Estimated H-index: 27
(A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi)
Published on Apr 1, 2018in Harmful Algae 5.01
Mathias Ahii Chia2
Estimated H-index: 2
(USP: University of São Paulo),
Jennifer G. Jankowiak3
Estimated H-index: 3
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 5 AuthorsChristopher J. Gobler18
Estimated H-index: 18
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Abstract Microcystis and Anabaena (Dolichospermum) are among the most toxic cyanobacterial genera and often succeed each other during harmful algal blooms. The role allelopathy plays in the succession of these genera is not fully understood. The allelopathic interactions of six strains of Microcystis and Anabaena under different nutrient conditions in co-culture and in culture-filtrate experiments were investigated. Microcystis strains significantly reduced the growth of Anabaena strains in mixe...
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Journal of Wildlife Diseases 1.15
Danielle E. Buttke5
Estimated H-index: 5
(NPS: National Park Service),
Alicia Walker (Marine Science Institute)+ 6 AuthorsPaul V. Zimba27
Estimated H-index: 27
(A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi)
ABSTRACT: On 16 September 2015, a red tide (Karenia brevis) bloom impacted coastal areas of Padre Island National Seashore Park, Texas, US. Two days later and about 0.9 km inland, 30–40 adult green tree frogs (Hyla cinerea) were found dead after displaying tremors, weakness, labored breathing, and other signs of neurologic impairment. A rainstorm accompanied by high winds, rough surf, and high tides, which could have aerosolized brevetoxin, occurred on the morning of the mortality event. Frog ca...
Published on Mar 1, 2017in Harmful Algae 5.01
Paul V. Zimba27
Estimated H-index: 27
(A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi),
I-Shuo Huang3
Estimated H-index: 3
(A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi)
+ 3 AuthorsRichard E. Triemer25
Estimated H-index: 25
(MSU: Michigan State University)
Abstract Euglena sanguinea is known to produce the alkaloid toxin euglenophycin and is known to cause fish kills and inhibit mammalian tissue and microalgal culture growth. An analysis of over 30 species of euglenoids for accumulation of euglenophycin identified six additional species producing the toxin; and six of the seven E. sanguinea strains produced the toxin. A phylogenetic assessment of these species confirmed most taxa were in the Euglenaceae, whereas synthesis capability apparently has...
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Journal of Phycology 2.83
Paul V. Zimba27
Estimated H-index: 27
(A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi),
I-Shuo Huang3
Estimated H-index: 3
(A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi)
+ 1 AuthorsEric W. Linton10
Estimated H-index: 10
(CMU: Central Michigan University)
Cyanobacteria occupy many niches within terrestrial, planktonic, and benthic habitats. The diversity of habitats colonized, similarity of morphology, and phenotypic plasticity all contribute to the difficulty of cyanobacterial identification. An unknown marine filamentous cyanobacterium was isolated from an aquatic animal rearing facility having mysid mortality events. The cyanobacterium originated from Corpus Christi Bay, TX. Filaments are rarely solitary, benthic mat forming, unbranched, and n...
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