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Richard B. Woodward
Northwestern University
6Publications
1H-index
2Citations
Publications 6
Newest
Published on Jan 16, 2019in Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation 3.87
Richard B. Woodward1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NU: Northwestern University),
Levi J. Hargrove29
Estimated H-index: 29
(NU: Northwestern University)
Background Pattern recognition technology allows for more intuitive control of myoelectric prostheses. However, the need to collect electromyographic data to initially train the pattern recognition system, and to re-train it during prosthesis use, adds complexity that can make using such a system difficult. Although experienced clinicians may be able to guide users to ensure successful data collection methods, they may not always be available when a user needs to (re)train their device.
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Published on Jul 1, 2018 in EMBC (International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society)
Richard B. Woodward1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NU: Northwestern University),
Levi J. Hargrove29
Estimated H-index: 29
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Published on Jul 1, 2018 in EMBC (International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society)
Yuni Teh (NU: Northwestern University), Richard B. Woodward1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NU: Northwestern University),
Levi J. Hargrove29
Estimated H-index: 29
(NU: Northwestern University)
Myoelectric pattern recognition using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifiers has been a wellestablished control method for upper limb prostheses for many years. More recently, linear regression (LR) controllers have been proposed as an alternative solution due to their ability to control multiple degrees of freedom (DOF) simultaneously. The aim of this experiment was to compare the online performance of LDA and LR control systems under three electromyographic (EMG) signal conditions: bas...
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Published on Jun 1, 2017
Richard B. Woodward1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago),
Jill M. Cancio1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 4 AuthorsAsim Smailagic28
Estimated H-index: 28
(CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)
Successful prosthesis use is largely dependent on providing patients with high-quality, individualized pre-prosthetic training, ideally completed under the supervision of a trained therapist. Computer-based training systems, or ‘virtual coaches,’ designed to augment rehabilitation training protocols are an emerging area of research and could be a convenient and low-cost alternative to supplement the therapy received by the patient. In this contribution we completed an iterative needs focus group...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2016 in EMBC (International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society)
Richard B. Woodward1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago),
John A. Spanias4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago),
Levi J. Hargrove29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago)
Powered lower limb prostheses have the ability to provide greater mobility for amputee patients. Such prostheses often have pre-programmed modes which can allow activities such as climbing stairs and descending ramps, something which many amputees struggle with when using non-powered limbs. Previous literature has shown how pattern classification can allow seamless transitions between modes with a high accuracy and without any user interaction. Although accurate, training and testing each subjec...
1 Citations Source Cite
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