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Lisa K. Schwarz
University of California, Santa Cruz
ForagingPredationEcologyPopulationBiology
20Publications
8H-index
236Citations
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Publications 20
Newest
#1Enrico Pirotta (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 14
#2Marc Mangel (University of Bergen)H-Index: 66
Last. Leslie New (Washington State University Vancouver)H-Index: 13
view all 12 authors...
This study was supported by Office of Naval Research grant N00014‐16‐1‐2858: ‘PCoD+: Developing widely‐applicable models of the population consequences of disturbance’. DPC, MM, EAM and LKS were supported by the E&P Sound and Marine Life Joint Industry Project of the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers. JAG was supported by funding from the Young Investigator Program at the Office of Naval Research (award no. N00014‐16‐1‐2477). VH was funded by European Research Council Grant No. ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Enrico Pirotta (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 14
#2Lisa K. Schwarz (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 8
Last. Leslie New (Washington State University Vancouver)H-Index: 13
view all 5 authors...
Office of Naval Research (N00014-00-1-0880; N00014-03-1-0651; N00014-08-1-1195; N00014-10-1-0356 and N00014-02-1-1012); International Association of Oil and Gas Producers (E & P Sound and Marine Life Joint Industry Project No. JIP 22 07-23); Alfred P. Sloan Foundation,Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation (Tagging of Pacific Predators Program)
2 CitationsSource
#1Elizabeth A. McHuron (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 8
#2Lisa K. Schwarz (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 8
Last. Marc Mangel (University of Bergen)H-Index: 66
view all 4 authors...
Human activities continue to expand in marine and terrestrial environments, leading to increased interactions with wildlife that can have negative impacts on population dynamics. Approaches for quantifying how these interactions translate to population-level effects are therefore crucial for effective management practices and balancing human-wildlife tradeoffs. We developed a method using state-dependent behavioral theory implemented via Stochastic Dynamic Programming (SDP) for predicting the po...
7 CitationsSource
#1Enrico Pirotta (UCC: University College Cork)H-Index: 14
#2Cormac G. Booth (St And: University of St Andrews)H-Index: 5
Last. John Harwood (St And: University of St Andrews)H-Index: 28
view all 16 authors...
This review was supported by Office of Naval Research grant N00014‐16‐1‐2858: “PCoD+: Developing widely‐applicable models of the population consequences of disturbance.” The work benefited from discussions with participants in a working group supported by Office of Naval Research (ONR) grants N00014‐09‐1‐0896 to the University of California, Santa Barbara and N00014‐12‐1‐0274 to the University of California, Davis. It also benefited from discussions and analyses funded by the EP supported by the...
15 CitationsSource
#1Enrico PirottaH-Index: 14
#2Marc MangelH-Index: 66
Last. Leslie NewH-Index: 13
view all 10 authors...
AbstractIntegrating behavior and physiology is critical to formulating new hypotheses on the evolution of animal life-history strategies. Migratory capital breeders acquire most of the energy they need to sustain migration, gestation, and lactation before parturition. Therefore, when predicting the impact of environmental variation on such species, a mechanistic understanding of the physiology of their migratory behavior is required. Using baleen whales as a model system, we developed a dynamic ...
14 CitationsSource
5 CitationsSource
#1Elizabeth A. McHuron (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 8
#2Daniel P. Costa (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 72
Last. Marc Mangel (University of Bergen)H-Index: 66
view all 4 authors...
Summary 1.Anthropogenic disturbance is of increasing concern for wildlife populations, necessitating the development of models that link behavioural changes at the individual level with biologically meaningful changes at the population level. 2.We developed a general framework for estimating the fitness consequences of disturbance that affects foraging behaviour using state-dependent behavioural theory implemented by Stochastic Dynamic Programming (SDP). We illustrate this framework using genera...
13 CitationsSource
#2Marc MangelH-Index: 66
Last. Daniel P. CostaH-Index: 72
view all 4 authors...
6 CitationsSource
#1Erica Fleishman (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 23
#2Daniel P. Costa (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 72
Last. Randall S. Wells (Chicago Zoological Society)H-Index: 46
view all 11 authors...
We provide guidance for monitoring whether human activities affect the physiology or behavior of marine mammals and, if so, whether those effects may lead to changes in survival and reproduction at the population level. We suggest that four elements be included in designing and implementing such a monitoring program. The first is development of a theory of change: a set of mechanistic hypotheses that outline why a given activity might be expected to have one or more measurable effects on individ...
14 CitationsSource
#1Daniel P. CostaH-Index: 72
#2Luis A. HückstädtH-Index: 15
Last. Nicolas J. GalesH-Index: 1
view all 8 authors...
An essential component of risk assessment is identification whether individuals will be exposed to a risk. This requires information on the proportion of the population exposed, for how long, and during what activity (i.e., feeding, migrating, and breeding). Using satellite telemetry data for humpback and blue whales feeding and migratory regions in Antarctica, California, and Bering Sea, we modeled the potential exposure of individuals to an acoustic disturbance. Foraging and transit regions al...
5 CitationsSource
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