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M.M. Koo
University College London
9Publications
3H-index
23Citations
Publications 9
Newest
#1M.M. Koo (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
#2Greg Rubin (Newcastle University)H-Index: 28
Last.Georgios Lyratzopoulos (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 35
view all 4 authors...
Objectives Cancer can be diagnosed in the absence of tumour-related symptoms, but little is known about the frequency and circumstances preceding such diagnoses which occur outside participation in screening programmes. We aimed to examine incidentally diagnosed cancer among a cohort of cancer patients diagnosed in England. Design Cross-sectional study of national primary care audit data on an incident cancer patient population. Setting We analysed free-text information on the presenting feature...
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#1M.M. Koo (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
#2Christian von Wagner (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 31
Last.Georgios Lyratzopoulos (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 35
view all 7 authors...
Background: Abdominal symptoms at presentation are common among patients subsequently diagnosed with cancer. While public health education campaigns in England and other countries have traditionally focused on 'red flag' symptoms associated with a single common cancer (e.g., 'blood in poo' and colorectal cancer), there is increasing interest in raising awareness of symptoms grouped by body area or system (eg 'abdominal symptoms'). Evidence regarding the frequency and nature of abdominal symptoms...
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#1M.M. Koo (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
#2Greg Rubin (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 28
Last.Georgios Lyratzopoulos (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 35
view all 3 authors...
Background: Cancer control strategies in different countries increasingly encompass public health education campaigns that aim to promote earlier presentation and diagnosis of cancer by raising awareness of possible cancer symptoms. However, the theoretical understanding that underpins these complex early diagnosis interventions remains underdeveloped. Aim: To propose a theoretical framework to guide the design, implementation, and evaluation of cancer symptom awareness campaigns and motivate fu...
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#1M.M. Koo (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
#2Christian von Wagner (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 31
Last.Georgios Lyratzopoulos (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 35
view all 7 authors...
Background: Raising awareness of possible cancer symptoms is important for timely help-seeking; recent campaigns have focused on symptom groups (such as abdominal symptoms) rather than individual alarm symptoms associated with particular cancer sites. The evidence base supporting such initiatives is still emerging however; understanding the frequency and nature of presenting abdominal symptoms among cancer patients could inform the design and evaluation of public health awareness campaigns. Meth...
1 CitationsSource
#1Annie Herbert (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 13
#2M.M. Koo (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
Last.Georgios Lyratzopoulos (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 35
view all 7 authors...
The aim of this study was to examine temporal trends in overall and stage-specific incidence of melanoma. Using population-based data on patients diagnosed with melanoma in East Anglia, England, 1996-2015, we estimated age-standardized time trends in annual incidence rates for each stage at diagnosis. Negative binomial regression was used to model trends over time adjusted for sex, age group and deprivation, and to subsequently examine variation in stage-specific trends by sex and age group. The...
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#1M.M. KooH-Index: 3
Diagnosing cancer earlier is an important strand of cancer control. Interventions promoting early diagnosis such as awareness campaigns and fast-track clinical pathways are increasingly commonplace in England and other countries, but their theoretical underpinning is limited. Cancer symptoms are critical components of such interventions, but evidence regarding the presenting symptoms of individuals diagnosed with cancer and measures of diagnostic timeliness remains sparse. I sought to address th...
#1M.M. Koo (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
#2Willie Hamilton (University of Exeter)H-Index: 59
Last.Georgios Lyratzopoulos (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 35
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Early diagnosis is an important aspect of contemporary cancer prevention and control strategies, as the majority of patients are diagnosed following symptomatic presentation. The nature of presenting symptoms can critically influence the length of the diagnostic intervals from symptom onset to presentation (the patient interval), and from first presentation to specialist referral (the primary care interval). Understanding which symptoms are associated with longer diagnostic intervals to...
10 CitationsSource
#1M.M. Koo (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
#2Christian von Wagner (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 31
Last.Georgios Lyratzopoulos (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 35
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Introduction Most symptomatic women with breast cancer have relatively short diagnostic intervals but a substantial minority experience prolonged journeys to diagnosis. Atypical presentations (with symptoms other than breast lump) may be responsible. Methods We examined the presenting symptoms of breast cancer in women using data from a national audit initiative (n=2316). Symptoms were categorised topographically. We investigated variation in the length of the patient interval (time fro...
7 CitationsSource
#1M.M. Koo (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
#2Yin ZhouH-Index: 5
Last.Georgios Lyratzopoulos (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 35
view all 3 authors...
YZ is supported by an Academic Clinical Fellowship in General Practice, awarded by Health Education East of England. GL is supported by a Cancer Research UK Clinician Scientist Fellowship (A18180).
5 CitationsSource
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