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Adam S. Grabell
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Developmental psychologyPsychologyEarly childhoodAggressionSocial psychology
18Publications
8H-index
237Citations
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Publications 18
Newest
#1Adam S. Grabell (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 8
#2Hannah M. Jones (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 1
Last. Susan B. Perlman (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 20
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Standardized developmentally-based assessment systems have transformed the capacity to identify trans-diagnostic behavioral markers of mental disorder risk in early childhood, notably, clinically significant irritability and externalizing behaviors. However, behavior-based instruments that both differentiate risk for persistent psychopathology from normative misbehavior, and are feasible for community clinicians to implement, are in nascent phases of development. Young children's facial...
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#1Adam S. Grabell (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 8
#2Theodore J. Huppert (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 25
Last. Susan B. Perlman (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 20
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Deliberate emotion regulation, the ability to willfully modulate emotional experiences, is shaped through interpersonal scaffolding and forecasts later functioning in multiple domains. However, nascent deliberate emotion regulation in early childhood is poorly understood due to a paucity of studies that simulate interpersonal scaffolding of this skill and measure its occurrence in multiple modalities. Our goal was to identify neural and behavioral components of early deliberate emotion ...
Source
#1Adam S. Grabell (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 8
#2Theodore J. Huppert (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 25
Last. Susan B. Perlman (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 20
view all 8 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Courtney A. ZulaufH-Index: 1
Last. Sheryl L. OlsonH-Index: 29
view all 4 authors...
3 CitationsSource
#1Adam S. Grabell (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 8
#2Yanwei Li (SEU: Southeast University)H-Index: 2
Last. Susan B. Perlman (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 20
view all 6 authors...
Burgeoning interest in early childhood irritability has recently turned toward neuroimaging techniques to better understand normal versus abnormal irritability using dimensional methods. Current accounts largely assume a linear relationship between poor frustration management, an expression of irritability, and its underlying neural circuitry. However, the relationship between these constructs may not be linear (i.e., operate differently at varying points across the irritability spectrum), with ...
18 CitationsSource
#1Adam S. Grabell (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 8
#2Sheryl L. Olson (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 29
Last. William J. Gehring (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 30
view all 5 authors...
Deficient self-regulation plays a key role in the etiology of early onset disruptive behavior disorders and signals risk for chronic psychopathology. However, to date, there has been no research comparing preschool children with and without high levels of disruptive behavior using Event Related Potentials (ERPs) associated with specific self-regulation sub-processes. We examined 15 preschool children with high levels of disruptive behavior (35 % female) and 20 peers with low disruptive behavior ...
7 CitationsSource
#1Yanwei Li (SEU: Southeast University)H-Index: 2
#2Adam S. Grabell (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 8
Last. Susan B. Perlman (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 20
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Preschool (age 3–5) is a phase of rapid development in both cognition and emotion, making this a period in which the neurodevelopment of each domain is particularly sensitive to that of the other. During this period, children rapidly learn how to flexibly shift their attention between competing demands and, at the same time, acquire critical emotion regulation skills to respond to negative affective challenges. The integration of cognitive flexibility and individual differences in irrit...
18 CitationsSource
#1Courtney A. Zulauf (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 1
Last. Sheryl L. OlsonH-Index: 29
view all 4 authors...
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#1Rebecca Waller (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 17
#2Luke W. Hyde (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 27
Last. Sheryl L. Olson (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 29
view all 5 authors...
Background: Early-starting child conduct problems (CP) are linked to the development of persistent antisocial behavior. Researchers have theorized multiple pathways to CP and that CP comprise separable domains, marked by callous-unemotional (CU) behavior, oppositional behavior, or ADHD symptoms. However, a lack of empirical evidence exists from studies that have examined whether there are unique correlates of these domains. Methods: We examined differential correlates of CU, oppositional, and AD...
43 CitationsSource
#1Adam S. Grabell (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 8
#2Sheryl L. Olson (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 29
Last. Twila Tardif (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 25
view all 8 authors...
Cognitive determinants of emotion regulation, such as effortful control, have been hypothesized to modulate young children's physiological response to emotional stress. It is unknown, however, whether this model of emotion regulation generalizes across Western and non-Western cultures. The current study examined the relation between both behavioral and questionnaire measures of effortful control and densely sampled, stress-induced cortisol trajectories in U.S. and Chinese preschoolers. Participa...
14 CitationsSource
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