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Nan Zhang
Peking University
19Publications
9H-index
559Citations
Publications 20
Newest
#1Nan Zhang (PKU: Peking University)H-Index: 9
#2Mark D. Behn (WHOI: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)H-Index: 2
Last.Chris Kincaid (URI: University of Rhode Island)H-Index: 17
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Source
#1Chuan Huang (PKU: Peking University)H-Index: 1
#2Nan Zhang (PKU: Peking University)H-Index: 9
Last.Shijie Zhong (CU: University of Colorado Boulder)H-Index: 51
view all 7 authors...
Source
#1Haoyuan Li (PKU: Peking University)
#2Nan Zhang (PKU: Peking University)H-Index: 9
Last.E. M. Parmentier (Brown University)H-Index: 14
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#1Nan Zhang (PKU: Peking University)H-Index: 9
#2Zhuo Dang (PKU: Peking University)H-Index: 1
Last.Zheng-Xiang Li (Curtin University)H-Index: 74
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Abstract Understanding the dominant force responsible for supercontinent breakup is crucial for establishing Earth’s geodynamic evolution that includes supercontinent cycles and plate tectonics. Conventionally, two forces have been considered: the push by mantle plumes from the sub-continental mantle which is called the active force for breakup, and the dragging force from oceanic subduction retreat which is called the passive force for breakup. However, the relative importance of these two forc...
8 CitationsSource
#1Nan Zhang (PKU: Peking University)H-Index: 9
#2Zheng-Xiang Li (Curtin University)H-Index: 74
Abstract It has been established that almost all known mantle plumes since the Mesozoic formed above the two lower mantle large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs). The Hainan plume is one of the rare exceptions in that instead of rising above the LLSVPs, it is located within the broad global mantle downwelling zone, therefore classified as a “lone plume”. Here, we use the Hainan plume example to investigate the feasibility of such lone plumes being generated by subducting slabs in the mantle ...
6 CitationsSource
#1Nan Zhang (PKU: Peking University)H-Index: 9
#2Nick Dygert (Brown University)H-Index: 8
Last.E. M. Parmentier (Brown University)H-Index: 14
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Lunar cumulate mantle overturn and the subsequent upwelling of overturned mantle cumulates provides a potential framework for understanding the first-order thermochemical evolution of the Moon. Upwelling of ilmenite-bearing cumulates (IBC) after the overturn has a dominant influence on the dynamics and long-term thermal evolution of the lunar mantle. An important parameter determining the stability and convective behaviour of the IBC is its viscosity, which was recently constrained through rock-...
7 CitationsSource
#1Nan Zhang (PKU: Peking University)H-Index: 9
#2Nick Dygert (Brown University)H-Index: 8
Last.E. M. Parmentier (Brown University)H-Index: 14
view all 4 authors...
Source
#1Nan Zhang (PKU: Peking University)H-Index: 9
#2Zheng‐Xiang Li (Curtin University)
Last.Shijie Zhong (CU: University of Colorado Boulder)H-Index: 51
view all 3 authors...
Source
#1Nan ZhangH-Index: 9
Over the years since the Apollo era, the current lunar interior structure has been investigated using seismic, gravity, and magnetic field data. The Apollo seismic network recorded about 1,800 meteoroid impacts, 28 energetic shallow moonquakes (with body wave magnitudes up to five and hypocenters about 100 km below the surface), and about 7,000 extremely weak deep moonquakes that were located about halfway to the center of the Moon (e.g., Wieczorek 2009). The deep moonquakes are very enigmatic i...
#1Nan Zhang (WHOI: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)H-Index: 9
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