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Svante Pääbo
Max Planck Society
401Publications
120H-index
47.6kCitations
Publications 401
Newest
2018 in Cell [IF: 30.41]
Benjamin Vernot18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Max Planck Society),
Svante Pääbo120
Estimated H-index: 120
(Max Planck Society)
By examining the genomes of present-day people from Asia, researchers show that modern humans met and interbred with Denisovans, distant relatives to Neanderthals, on at least two occasions. As a result, people today carry DNA from two different Denisovan populations.
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Thiseas Christos Lamnidis2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Max Planck Society),
Kerttu Majander1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Max Planck Society),
Choongwon Jeong5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Max Planck Society)
... more
European population history has been shaped by migrations of people, and their subsequent admixture. Recently, ancient DNA has brought new insights into European migration events linked to the advent of agriculture, and possibly to the spread of Indo-European languages. However, little is known about the ancient population history of north-eastern Europe, in particular about populations speaking Uralic languages, such as Finns and Saami. Here we analyse ancient genomic data from 11 individuals f...
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2018 in Nature [IF: 40.14]
Mateja Hajdinjak9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Max Planck Society),
Qiaomei Fu21
Estimated H-index: 21
,
Alexander Hübner4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Max Planck Society)
... more
Many questions remain about the relationship between populations of Neanderthals around the time of their final interactions with modern humans, and how this contributed to the evolution of modern humans. Janet Kelso, Svante Paabo and colleagues sequenced the genomes of five Neanderthals that lived between 39,000 and 47,000 years ago, broadening the temporal and geographical range of available Neanderthal genomes. They analyse these genomes together with previously sequenced ancient genomes and ...
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2018 in Science [IF: 37.20]
Marieke Sophia van de Loosdrecht1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Max Planck Society),
Abdeljalil Bouzouggar13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Max Planck Society),
Louise T. Humphrey21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Natural History Museum)
... more
North Africa is a key region for understanding human history, but the genetic history of its people is largely unknown. We present genomic data from seven 15,000-year-old modern humans from Morocco, attributed to the Iberomaurusian culture. We find a genetic affinity with early Holocene Near Easterners, best represented by Levantine Natufians, suggesting a pre-agricultural connection between Africa and the Near East. We do not find evidence for gene flow from Paleolithic Europeans into Late Plei...
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2018 in bioRxiv
Michael Dannemann14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Max Planck Society),
Benjamin Vernot18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Max Planck Society),
Svante Pääbo120
Estimated H-index: 120
(Max Planck Society)
... more
Pluripotent stem cells from diverse humans offer the potential to study human functional variation in controlled culture environments. A portion of this variation originates from ancient admixture between modern humans and Neandertals, which introduced alleles that left a phenotypic legacy on individual humans today. Here we show that a large repository of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) harbors extensive Neandertal DNA, including most known functionally relevant Neandertal alleles ...
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2018 in bioRxiv
Martin Petr2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Max Planck Society),
Svante Pääbo120
Estimated H-index: 120
(Max Planck Society),
Janet Kelso49
Estimated H-index: 49
(Max Planck Society)
... more
Several studies have suggested that introgressed Neandertal DNA was subjected to negative selection in modern humans due to deleterious alleles that had accumulated in the Neandertals after they split from the modern human lineage. A striking observation in support of this is an apparent monotonic decline in Neandertal ancestry observed in modern humans in Europe over the past 45 thousand years. Here we show that this apparent decline is an artifact caused by gene flow between West Eurasians and...
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2018 in Nature [IF: 40.14]
Viviane Slon11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Max Planck Society),
Fabrizio Mafessoni4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Max Planck Society),
Benjamin Vernot18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Max Planck Society)
... more
Neanderthals and Denisovans are extinct groups of hominins that separated from each other more than 390,000 years ago1,2. Here we present the genome of ‘Denisova 11’, a bone fragment from Denisova Cave (Russia)3 and show that it comes from an individual who had a Neanderthal mother and a Denisovan father. The father, whose genome bears traces of Neanderthal ancestry, came from a population related to a later Denisovan found in the cave4–6. The mother came from a population more closely related t...
Ref 39Cited 14
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Bart Van Laer (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility), Ulrike Kapp11
Estimated H-index: 11
(European Synchrotron Radiation Facility),
Montserrat Soler-Lopez3
Estimated H-index: 3
(European Synchrotron Radiation Facility)
... more
The availability of genomic data from extinct homini such as Neanderthals has caused a revolution in palaeontology allowing the identification of modern human-specific protein substitutions. Currently, little is known as to how these substitutions alter the proteins on a molecular level. Here, we investigate adenylosuccinate lyase, a conserved enzyme involved in purine metabolism for which several substitutions in the modern human protein (hADSL) have been described to affect intelligence and be...
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2018 in Current Biology [IF: 8.85]
Philipp Gunz34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Max Planck Society),
Amanda K. Tilot1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Max Planck Society),
K. Wittfeld6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Greifswald)
... more
Summary One of the features that distinguishes modern humans from our extinct relatives and ancestors is a globular shape of the braincase [1–4]. As the endocranium closely mirrors the outer shape of the brain, these differences might reflect altered neural architecture [4, 5]. However, in the absence of fossil brain tissue, the underlying neuroanatomical changes as well as their genetic bases remain elusive. To better understand the biological foundations of modern human endocranial shape, we t...
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2017 in bioRxiv
David Gokhman5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Lily Agranat-Tamir3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Genevieve Housman6
Estimated H-index: 6
... more
Identifying changes in gene regulation that shaped human-specific traits is critical to understanding human evolution. Here, we use >60 DNA methylation maps of different human groups, both present-day and ancient, as well as six chimpanzee maps, to detect regulatory changes that emerged specifically in modern humans. We show that genes affecting vocalization and facial features went through particularly extensive changes in methylation. Especially, we identify expansive changes in a network of g...
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