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Svante Pääbo
Max Planck Society
413Publications
122H-index
50.5kCitations
Publications 413
Newest
Published on Jan 30, 2019in Nature Communications 12.35
Thibaut Devièse10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Oxford),
Diyendo Massilani1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Max Planck Society)
+ 10 AuthorsB. Gunchinsuren4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Mongolian Academy of Sciences)
A skullcap found in the Salkhit Valley in northeast Mongolia is, to our knowledge, the only Pleistocene hominin fossil found in the country. It was initially described as an individual with possible archaic affinities, but its ancestry has been debated since the discovery. Here, we determine the age of the Salkhit skull by compound-specific radiocarbon dating of hydroxyproline to 34,950–33,900 Cal. BP (at 95% probability), placing the Salkhit individual in the Early Upper Paleolithic period. We ...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Antiquity 1.66
Katerina Douka22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Max Planck Society),
Samantha Brown3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 3 AuthorsMichael V. Shunkov12
Estimated H-index: 12
Source Cite
Martin Petr3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Max Planck Society),
Svante Pääbo122
Estimated H-index: 122
(Max Planck Society)
+ 1 AuthorsBenjamin Vernot19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Max Planck Society)
Several studies have suggested that introgressed Neandertal DNA was subjected to negative selection in modern humans. A striking observation in support of this is an apparent monotonic decline in Neandertal ancestry observed in modern humans in Europe over the past 45,000 years. Here, we show that this decline is an artifact likely caused by gene flow between modern human populations, which is not taken into account by statistics previously used to estimate Neandertal ancestry. When we apply a s...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2019
Bence Viola15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Philipp Gunz34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Max Planck Society)
+ 6 AuthorsA.P. Derevianko14
Estimated H-index: 14
Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Current Biology 9.25
Philipp Gunz34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Max Planck Society),
Amanda K. Tilot2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Max Planck Society)
+ 24 AuthorsTulio Guadalupe14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Max Planck Society)
Summary One of the features that distinguishes modern humans from our extinct relatives and ancestors is a globular shape of the braincase [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ]. As the endocranium closely mirrors the outer shape of the brain, these differences might reflect altered neural architecture [ 4 , 5 ]. However, in the absence of fossil brain tissue, the underlying neuroanatomical changes as well as their genetic bases remain elusive. To better understand the biological foundations of modern human endocran...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Nature 41.58
Katerina Douka22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Oxford),
Viviane Slon12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Max Planck Society)
+ 18 AuthorsRainer Grün51
Estimated H-index: 51
(Griffith University)
Denisova Cave in the Siberian Altai (Russia) is a key site for understanding the complex relationships between hominin groups that inhabited Eurasia in the Middle and Late Pleistocene epoch. DNA sequenced from human remains found at this site has revealed the presence of a hitherto unknown hominin group, the Denisovans1,2, and high-coverage genomes from both Neanderthal and Denisovan fossils provide evidence for admixture between these two populations3. Determining the age of these fossils is im...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Nature Communications 12.35
Thiseas Christos Lamnidis3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Max Planck Society),
Kerttu Majander4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Max Planck Society)
+ 14 AuthorsAntje Weihmann7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Max Planck Society)
European population history has been shaped by migrations of people, and their subsequent admixture. Recently, ancient DNA has brought new insights into European migration events linked to the advent of agriculture, and possibly to the spread of Indo-European languages. However, little is known about the ancient population history of north-eastern Europe, in particular about populations speaking Uralic languages, such as Finns and Saami. Here we analyse ancient genomic data from 11 individuals f...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.12
Bart Van Laer (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility), Ulrike Kapp11
Estimated H-index: 11
(European Synchrotron Radiation Facility)
+ 4 AuthorsChristoph Mueller-Dieckmann18
Estimated H-index: 18
(European Synchrotron Radiation Facility)
The availability of genomic data from extinct homini such as Neanderthals has caused a revolution in palaeontology allowing the identification of modern human-specific protein substitutions. Currently, little is known as to how these substitutions alter the proteins on a molecular level. Here, we investigate adenylosuccinate lyase, a conserved enzyme involved in purine metabolism for which several substitutions in the modern human protein (hADSL) have been described to affect intelligence and be...
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