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Svante Pääbo
Max Planck Society
GeneGenomeMitochondrial DNAGeneticsBiology
427Publications
129H-index
59.5kCitations
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Publications 424
Newest
#1Vita V. StepanovaH-Index: 3
#2Kaja Moczulska (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 1
Last. Konstantinos Anastassiadis (TUD: Dresden University of Technology)H-Index: 37
view all 24 authors...
We analyze the metabolomes of humans, chimpanzees and macaques in muscle, kidney and three different regions of the brain. Whereas several compounds in amino acid metabolism occur at either higher or lower concentrations in humans than in the other primates, metabolites in oxidative phosphorylation and purine biosynthesis are consistently present in lower concentrations in the brains of humans. In particular, metabolites downstream of adenylosuccinate lyase, which catalyzes two reactions in puri...
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#1Jean-Jacques Hublin (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 58
#2Nikolay Sirakov (BAS: Bulgarian Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 4
Last. Mateja Hajdinjak (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 10
view all 32 authors...
The Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition in Europe witnessed the replacement and partial absorption of local Neanderthal populations by Homo sapiens populations of African origin1. However, this process probably varied across regions and its details remain largely unknown. In particular, the duration of chronological overlap between the two groups is much debated, as are the implications of this overlap for the nature of the biological and cultural interactions between Neanderthals and H. sap...
2 CitationsSource
#1Stephan Riesenberg (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 2
#2Manjusha Chintalapati (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 2
Last. Svante Pääbo (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 129
view all 6 authors...
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#1Sabina Kanton (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 4
#2Michael James Boyle (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 2
Last. J. Gray Camp (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 9
view all 17 authors...
The human brain has undergone substantial change since humans diverged from chimpanzees and the other great apes1,2. However, the genetic and developmental programs that underlie this divergence are not fully understood. Here we have analysed stem cell-derived cerebral organoids using single-cell transcriptomics and accessible chromatin profiling to investigate gene-regulatory changes that are specific to humans. We first analysed cell composition and reconstructed differentiation trajectories o...
25 CitationsSource
#1Ekaterina E. Khrameeva (Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology)H-Index: 11
#2Ilia Kurochkin (Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology)H-Index: 3
Last. Philipp Khaitovich (Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology)H-Index: 42
view all 18 authors...
Identification of gene expression traits unique to the human brain sheds light on the mechanisms of human cognition. Here we searched for gene expression traits separating humans from other primates by analyzing 88,047 cell nuclei and 422 tissue samples representing 33 brain regions of humans, chimpanzees, bonobos, and macaques. We show that gene expression evolves rapidly within cell types, with more than two-thirds of cell type-specific differences not detected using conventional RNA sequencin...
2 CitationsSource
#1Lukas Bokelmann (MPG: Max Planck Society)
#2Mateja Hajdinjak (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 10
Last. Chris Stringer (Natural History Museum)H-Index: 68
view all 17 authors...
The Forbes’ Quarry and Devil’s Tower partial crania from Gibraltar are among the first Neanderthal remains ever found. Here, we show that small amounts of ancient DNA are preserved in the petrous bones of the 2 individuals despite unfavorable climatic conditions. However, the endogenous Neanderthal DNA is present among an overwhelming excess of recent human DNA. Using improved DNA library construction methods that enrich for DNA fragments carrying deaminated cytosine residues, we were able to se...
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#1Sabina Kanton (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 4
#2Michael James Boyle (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 2
Last. J. Gray Camp (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 9
view all 17 authors...
The human brain has changed dramatically since humans diverged from our closest living relatives, chimpanzees and the other great apes. However, the genetic and developmental programs underlying this divergence are not fully understood. Here, we have analyzed stem cell-derived cerebral organoids using single-cell transcriptomics (scRNA-seq) and accessible chromatin profiling (scATAC-seq) to explore gene regulatory changes that are specific to humans. We first analyze cell composition and reconst...
1 CitationsSource
#1Stéphane Peyrégne (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 4
#2Viviane Slon (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 14
Last. Kay Prüfer (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 35
view all 22 authors...
Little is known about the population history of Neandertals over the hundreds of thousands of years of their existence. We retrieved nuclear genomic sequences from two Neandertals, one from Hohlenstein-Stadel Cave in Germany and the other from Scladina Cave in Belgium, who lived around 120,000 years ago. Despite the deeply divergent mitochondrial lineage present in the former individual, both Neandertals are genetically closer to later Neandertals from Europe than to a roughly contemporaneous in...
1 CitationsSource
#1Katarzyna Bozek (OIST: Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology)H-Index: 12
#2Ekaterina E. Khrameeva (RAS: Russian Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 11
Last. Philipp Khaitovich (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 42
view all 21 authors...
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#1Bence ViolaH-Index: 19
#2Philipp Gunz (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 36
Last. Anatoly P. DereviankoH-Index: 18
view all 9 authors...
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