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Shintaro Yamada
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
3Publications
3H-index
122Citations
Publications 3
Newest
Published on Oct 18, 2017in Cell Cycle 3.30
Shintaro Yamada3
Estimated H-index: 3
(MSK: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center),
Seoyoung Kim3
Estimated H-index: 3
(MSK: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center)
+ 3 AuthorsScott Keeney47
Estimated H-index: 47
(MSK: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center)
ABSTRACTThe SPO11-generated DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination occur non-randomly across genomes, but mechanisms shaping their distribution and repair remain incompletely understood. Here, we expand on recent studies of nucleotide-resolution DSB maps in mouse spermatocytes. We find that trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 36 around DSB hotspots is highly correlated, both spatially and quantitatively, with trimethylation of H3 lysine 4, consistent with coordinated...
19 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2016in Cell 31.40
Julian Lange12
Estimated H-index: 12
(MSK: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center),
Shintaro Yamada3
Estimated H-index: 3
(MSK: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center)
+ 6 AuthorsScott Keeney47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Cornell University)
Summary Heritability and genome stability are shaped by meiotic recombination, which is initiated via hundreds of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The distribution of DSBs throughout the genome is not random, but mechanisms molding this landscape remain poorly understood. Here, we exploit genome-wide maps of mouse DSBs at unprecedented nucleotide resolution to uncover previously invisible spatial features of recombination. At fine scale, we reveal a stereotyped hotspot structure—DSBs occur withi...
64 Citations Source Cite
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