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Jessica C. Lee
University of Sydney
14Publications
4H-index
58Citations
Publications 14
Newest
#1Jessica C. Lee (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 4
#2Peter F. Lovibond (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 33
Last.Brett K. Hayes (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
#1Justine Fam (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 3
#2Jessica C. Lee (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 4
The number of students enrolling in postgraduate by research degrees has seen a large increase in recent years, a trend which is evident globally as well as within Australia. However, the rate at which PhD students are dropping out has also increased, indicating that students are not receiving adequate resources to support them throughout their candidature. We highlight that mentoring programs are effective in addressing inequality between PhD students, and describe a program that we have recent...
#1Jessica C. Lee (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 4
#2Evan J. Livesey (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 12
After discrimination learning between two stimuli that lie on a continuum, animals typically exhibit generalization on the basis of similarity to the physical features of the stimuli, often producing a peak-shifted gradient. However, post-discrimination generalization in humans usually resembles a monotonically increasing (e.g., linear) gradient that is better characterized as following a relational rule describing the difference between the stimuli. The current study tested whether rule-based g...
#1Jessica C. Lee (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 4
#2Evan J. Livesey (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 12
The prototype distortion task demonstrates that it is possible to learn about a category of physically similar stimuli through mere observation. However, there have been few attempts to test whether different encoding conditions affect learning in this task. This study compared prototypicality gradients produced under incidental learning conditions in which participants performed a visual search task, with those produced under intentional learning conditions in which participants were required t...
#1Louise Bezzina (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 1
#2Jessica C. Lee (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 4
Last.Ben Colagiuri (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 20
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Abstract Reward cues can contribute to overconsumption of food and drugs and can relapse. The failure of exposure therapies to reduce overconsumption and relapse is generally attributed to the context-specificity of extinction. However, no previous study has examined whether cue-elicited reward-seeking (as opposed to cue-reactivity) is sensitive to context renewal. We tested this possibility in 160 healthy volunteers using a Pavlovian-instrumental transfer (PIT) design involving voluntary respon...
#1Jessica C. Lee (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 4
#2Tom Beesley (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 12
Last.Evan J. Livesey (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 12
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The recent history of events can influence responding despite there being no contingent relationship between those events. These ‘sequential effects’ are ubiquitous in cognitive psychology, yet their study has been dominated by two-choice reaction time tasks in which sequences necessarily comprise simple response repetitions and alternations. The current study explored sequential effects in a three-choice reaction time task where the target was constrained to either move clockwise or anticlockwi...
#1Gabrielle Weidemann (University of Western Sydney)H-Index: 13
#2Erin Best (University of Western Sydney)H-Index: 1
Last.Peter F. Lovibond (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 33
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Single-cue delay eyeblink conditioning is presented as a prototypical example of automatic, nonsymbolic learning that is carried out by subcortical circuits. However, it has been difficult to assess the role of cognition in single-cue conditioning because participants become aware of the simple stimulus contingency so quickly. In this experiment (n 1⁄4 166), we masked the contingency to reduce awareness. We observed a strong relationship between contingency awareness and conditioned responding, ...
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