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Yoona Kim
University of South Australia
11Publications
6H-index
234Citations
Publications 11
Newest
#1Yoona KimH-Index: 6
#2Jennifer B. KeoghH-Index: 40
Last.Peter M. CliftonH-Index: 72
view all 3 authors...
Objectives: Accumulating epidemiological and intervention evidence suggest that nut consumption is associated with reduced incidence of some cardiometabolic diseases. However, to date no review of meta-analyses of epidemiological and intervention studies has evaluated the effects of nut consumption on cardiometabolic disease. Design/Results: Electronic searches for meta-analyses of epidemiological and intervention studies were undertaken in PubMed®/MEDLINE®. Meta-analyses of prospective studies ...
5 CitationsSource
Current research indicates curcumin [diferuloylmethane; a polyphenolic compound isolated from the rhizomes of the dietary spice turmeric (Curcuma longa)] exerts a beneficial effect on health which may be partly attributable to its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this review is to examine potential mechanisms of the actions of curcumin in both animal and human studies. Curcumin modulates relevant molecular target pathways to improve glucose and lipid metabolism, suppre...
Source
#1Yoona KimH-Index: 6
#2Jennifer B. KeoghH-Index: 40
Last.Peter M. CliftonH-Index: 72
view all 3 authors...
Epidemiological and clinical studies have indicated that nut consumption could be a healthy dietary strategy to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and related cardiovascular disease (CVD). The objective of this review is to examine the potential mechanisms of action of nuts addressing effects on glycemic control, weight management, energy balance, appetite, gut microbiota modification, lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial function and blood pressure with a focus on...
22 CitationsSource
#1Yoona Kim (UniSA: University of South Australia)H-Index: 6
#2Jennifer B. Keogh (UniSA: University of South Australia)H-Index: 40
Last.Peter M. Clifton (UniSA: University of South Australia)H-Index: 72
view all 3 authors...
Animal studies indicate that the composition of gut microbiota may be involved in the progression of insulin resistance to type 2 diabetes. Probiotics and/or prebiotics could be a promising approach to improve insulin sensitivity by favourably modifying the composition of the gut microbial community, reducing intestinal endotoxin concentrations and decreasing energy harvest. The aim of the present review was to investigate the effects of probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics (a combination of pr...
20 CitationsSource
Source
#1Yoona KimH-Index: 6
#2Jennifer B. KeoghH-Index: 40
Last.Peter M. CliftonH-Index: 72
view all 3 authors...
Epidemiological studies suggest that consumption of red and processed meat and refined grains are associated with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome and increased inflammatory and fibrinolytic markers. We hypothesised that a diet high in red and processed meat and refined grains (HMD) would increase inflammatory markers and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) compared with a diet high in dairy, whole grains, nuts and legumes (HWD). We performed a randomised crossover study of two four-wee...
5 CitationsSource
#1Yoona Kim (UniSA: University of South Australia)H-Index: 6
#2Jennifer B. Keogh (UniSA: University of South Australia)H-Index: 40
Last.Peter M. Clifton (UniSA: University of South Australia)H-Index: 72
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Background Red and processed meat and refined grains are associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Interventions are limited. We hypothesized that a diet high in red and processed meat and refined grains (HMD) would decrease insulin sensitivity compared to a diet high in whole grains, nuts, dairy and legumes with no red meat (HWD). Methods Forty-nine subjects without diabetes [15 men and 34 women, age, 35.6±15.7 years, body mass index (BMI), 27±5.9kg/m 2 ] underwent two 4-we...
8 CitationsSource
#1Yoona KimH-Index: 6
#2Jennifer B. KeoghH-Index: 40
Last.Peter M. CliftonH-Index: 72
view all 3 authors...
Epidemiological studies suggest that a diet high in processed meat, with a high glycemic index is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. It is not clear if this is due to altered insulin sensitivity or an enhanced postprandial glucose. We aimed to compare the acute metabolic response of two different types of meals after ingestion of the matching diet for four weeks. The study was a randomized, crossover acute meal study. Volunteers consumed either a red meat/refined grain meal or...
8 CitationsSource
#1Yoona KimH-Index: 6
#2Jennifer B. KeoghH-Index: 40
Last.Peter M. CliftonH-Index: 72
view all 3 authors...
Growing evidence from animal studies supports the anti-diabetic properties of some dietary polyphenols, suggesting that dietary polyphenols could be one dietary therapy for the prevention and management of Type 2 diabetes. This review aims to address the potential mechanisms of action of dietary polyphenols in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity based on in vitro and in vivo studies, and to provide a comprehensive overview of the anti-diabetic effects of commonly consum...
117 CitationsSource
#1Yoona Kim (UniSA: University of South Australia)H-Index: 6
#2Jennifer B. Keogh (UniSA: University of South Australia)H-Index: 40
Last.Peter M. Clifton (UniSA: University of South Australia)H-Index: 72
view all 3 authors...
Source
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