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Joseph Parker
California Institute of Technology
20Publications
10H-index
244Citations
Publications 20
Newest
#1Yu-Lingzi Zhou (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 1
#2Adam Ślipiński (CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)H-Index: 8
Last.Joseph Parker (California Institute of Technology)H-Index: 10
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Complex interspecies relationships are widespread among metazoans, but the evolutionary history of these lifestyles is poorly understood. We describe a fossil beetle in 99-million-year-old Burmese amber that we infer to have been a social impostor of the earliest-known ant colonies. Promyrmister kistneri gen. et sp. nov. belongs to the haeteriine clown beetles (Coleoptera: Histeridae), a major clade of ‘myrmecophiles’—specialized nest intruders with dramatic anatomical, chemical and behavioral a...
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#1Joseph Parker (California Institute of Technology)H-Index: 10
#2Brittany E. Owens (Louisiana State University Agricultural Center)H-Index: 2
We describe a new genus and new species of pselaphine rove beetle, Batriscydmaenus tishechkini Parker and Owens, from lowland Panamanian rainforest. The new taxon marks a radical departure from the basic pselaphine anatomical groundplan, with a globose body shape and a dramatic reduction of foveae, sulci and striae—features that are considered plesiomorphic in Pselaphinae. This overt simplification of the integument is typical of myrmecophile and termitophile taxa within Pselaphinae. A probable ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Zi-Wei Yin (SHNU: Shanghai Normal University)H-Index: 6
#2Joseph Parker (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 10
Last.Li-Zhen Li (SHNU: Shanghai Normal University)H-Index: 3
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Comprising more than 10,000 valid species, the staphylinid subfamily Pselaphinae is a major element of epigean habitats, and among the most diverse groups of rove beetles. Pselaphinae is split basally into two principal clades: the small supertribe Faronitae, and its sister group, the hyper-diverse ‘higher Pselaphinae’ containing the remaining five supertribes. Deducing the origins and divergence times of major higher Pselaphinae clades requires direct fossil evidence. Here we describe a new pse...
5 CitationsSource
#1Joseph Parker (California Institute of Technology)H-Index: 10
#2K. Taro Eldredge (KU: University of Kansas)H-Index: 2
Last.Steven R. Davis (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 14
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How symbiotic lifestyles evolve from free-living ecologies is poorly understood. Novel traits mediating symbioses may stem from preadaptations: features of free-living ancestors that predispose taxa to engage in nascent interspecies relationships. In Metazoa's largest family, Staphylinidae (rove beetles), the body plan within the subfamily Aleocharinae is preadaptive for symbioses with social insects. Short elytra expose a pliable abdomen that bears targetable glands for host manipulation or che...
1 CitationsSource
#1Shûhei Yamamoto (Kyushu University)H-Index: 11
#2Munetoshi Maruyama (Kyushu University)H-Index: 10
Last.Joseph Parker (Columbia University)H-Index: 10
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Fossil morphology is often used to infer the ecology of extinct species. In a recent report in Current Biology, Cai and colleagues [1] described an extinct rove beetle, Cretotrichopsenius burmiticus, from two specimens in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber (∼99 million years old). Based on morphology and the taxonomic group to which the specimens belong, the authors proposed that Cretotrichopsenius was a termitophile — a socially parasitic symbiont of termite colonies. Moreover, the new taxon was clai...
5 CitationsSource
#1Shûhei Yamamoto (Kyushu University)H-Index: 11
#2Yui Takahashi (University of Tsukuba)H-Index: 5
Last.Joseph Parker (Columbia University)H-Index: 10
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Jacobsoniidae is a small but perplexing beetle family, with unknown phylogenetic relationships to other polyphagan Coleoptera. To date, only a single fossil jacobsoniid has been described, from Eocene Baltic amber (~ 40 Ma). Here, we push back the oldest definitive record of Jacobsoniidae by approximately 60 million years with a new fossil species recovered from mid-Cretaceous (~ 99 Ma) Burmese amber from Myanmar. Remarkably, exploration of the fossil's morphology with confocal laser scanning mi...
8 CitationsSource
#1Munetoshi Maruyama (Kyushu University)H-Index: 10
#2Joseph Parker (Columbia University)H-Index: 10
Recent adaptive radiations provide striking examples of convergence [1–4], but the predictability of evolution over much deeper timescales is controversial, with a scarcity of ancient clades exhibiting repetitive patterns of phenotypic evolution [5, 6]. Army ants are ecologically dominant arthropod predators of the world’s tropics, with large nomadic colonies housing diverse communities of socially parasitic myrmecophiles [7]. Remarkable among these are many species of rove beetle (Staphylinidae...
16 CitationsSource
#1Shûhei Yamamoto (Kyushu University)H-Index: 11
#2Munetoshi Maruyama (Kyushu University)H-Index: 10
Last.Joseph Parker (Columbia University)H-Index: 10
view all 3 authors...
The evolution of eusociality in ants and termites propelled both insect groups to their modern ecological dominance. Yet, eusociality also fostered the evolution of social parasitism—an adverse symbiosis, in which the superorganismal colonies formed by these insects are infiltrated by a profusion of invertebrate species that target nest resources. Predominant among these are the aleocharine rove beetles (Staphylinidae), a vast and ecologically diverse subfamily with numerous morphologically and ...
28 CitationsSource
#1Munetoshi Maruyama (Kyushu University)H-Index: 10
#2Joseph Parker (Columbia University)H-Index: 10
Recent adaptive radiations provide striking examples of convergence, but the predictability of evolution over much deeper timescales is controversial, due to a scarcity of ancient clades exhibiting repetitive patterns of phenotypic evolution. Army ants are ecologically dominant arthropod predators of the world9s tropics, with large nomadic colonies housing diverse communities of socially parasitic myrmecophiles. Remarkable among these are many species of rove beetle (Staphylinidae) that exhibit ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Joseph Parker (Columbia University)H-Index: 10
Pselaphinae is an exceptionally species-rich, globally distributed subfamily of minute rove beetles (Staphylinidae), many of which are inquilines of social insects. Deducing the factors that drove pselaphine diversification and their evolutionary predisposition to inquilinism requires a reliable timescale of pselaphine cladogenesis. Pselaphinae is split into a small and highly plesiomorphic supertribe, Faronitae, and its sister group, the ‘higher Pselaphinae’ – a vast multi-tribe clade with a mo...
16 CitationsSource
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