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Lucy Shih Ju Hsu
University of Hong Kong
PsychologyLearning to readVocabularyLinguisticsLiteracy
7Publications
4H-index
27Citations
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Publications 7
Newest
#1Ka I. Ip (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 4
#2Rebecca A. Marks (UM: University of Michigan)
Last. loulia Kovelman (UM: University of Michigan)
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Morphological awareness, the ability to manipulate the smallest units of meaning, is critical for Chinese literacy. This is because Chinese characters typically reflect the morphemic, or morpho-syllabic units of language. Yet, the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying Chinese speakers’ morphological processing remain understudied. Proficient readers (N = 14) completed morphological and phonological judgment tasks in Chinese, in both auditory and visual modalities, during fMRI imaging. Ke...
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#1Lucy Shih Ju Hsu (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 4
#2Ka I. Ip (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 4
Last. Ioulia Kovelman (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 12
view all 5 authors...
ABSTRACTThe developmental process of reading acquisition is frequently conceptualized as a self-organizing mental network consisting of lexico-semantic, phonological and orthographical components. The developmental nature of this network varies across languages and is known to impact second-language learners of typologically different languages. Yet, it remains largely unknown whether such cross-linguistic differences interact within young bilingual learners of two typologically different langua...
4 CitationsSource
#1Lena V. Kremin (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 1
#2Maria M. Arredondo (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 5
Last. Ioulia Kovelman (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 12
view all 5 authors...
ABSTRACTModels of monolingual literacy propose that reading acquisition builds upon children’s semantic, phonological, and orthographic knowledge. The relationships between these components vary cross-linguistically, yet it is generally unknown how these differences impact bilingual children’s literacy. A comparison between Spanish–English bilingual and English monolingual children (ages 6–13, N = 70) from the US revealed that bilinguals had stronger associations between phonological and orthogr...
2 CitationsSource
#1Connie Suk-Han Ho (HKU: University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 30
#2Mo Zheng (HKU: University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 2
Last. Jocelyn Ching-Yan Kwok (HKU: University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 1
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Abstract The simple view of reading (SVR) proposes that reading comprehension is the product of two constructs, namely decoding and linguistic comprehension. The present study examined the adequacy of an extended SVR in Chinese. Participants were 190 pairs of Chinese twin children of Grades 1–3 recruited in Hong Kong. The children were given Chinese measures of decoding (character reading, word reading, and 1-min word reading), linguistic comprehension (morphological awareness, vocabulary, morph...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ka I. Ip (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 4
#2Lucy Shih Ju Hsu (HKU: University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 4
Last. Ioulia Kovelman (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 12
view all 5 authors...
Can bilingual exposure impact children's neural circuitry for learning to read? To answer this question, we investigated the brain bases of morphological awareness, one of the key spoken language abilities for learning to read in English and Chinese. Bilingual Chinese-English and monolingual English children (N = 22, ages 7–12) completed morphological tasks that best characterize each of their languages: compound morphology in Chinese (e.g. basket + ball = basketball) and derivational morphology...
7 CitationsSource
#1Margaret Ugolini (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 2
#2Neelima Wagley (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 3
Last. Ioulia Kovelman (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 12
view all 6 authors...
Phonological awareness, the ability to manipulate the sounds of language, is key for learning to read. The first step towards phonological competence is identification of syllables and rimes. In a continuous speech stream, syllables and rimes are marked by slow temporal rhythmic modulations, including changes in vowel intensity or amplitude rise time (ART). Prior work suggests that children's sensitivity to ART predicts reading ability and dyslexia across languages. Yet, little is known about th...
4 CitationsSource
#1Maria M. Arredondo (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 5
#2Ka I. Ip (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 4
Last. Ioulia Kovelman (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 12
view all 5 authors...
How does the developing brain support the transition from spoken language to print? Two spoken language abilities form the initial base of child literacy across languages: knowledge of language sounds (phonology) and knowledge of the smallest units that carry meaning (morphology). While phonology has received much attention from the field, the brain mechanisms that support morphological competence for learning to read remain largely unknown. In the present study, young English-speaking children ...
9 CitationsSource
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