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Joel D. Irish
Liverpool John Moores University
PaleontologyArchaeologyDentistryPopulationBiology
132Publications
21H-index
1,710Citations
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Publications 147
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#1Joel D. IrishH-Index: 21
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#2Joel D. IrishH-Index: 21
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#1Joel D. Irish (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)H-Index: 21
#2Adeline Morez (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)
Last. G. Richard Scott (UNR: University of Nevada, Reno)H-Index: 12
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OBJECTIVES: Crown and root traits, like those in the Arizona State University Dental Anthropology System (ASUDAS), are seemingly useful as genetic proxies. However, recent studies report mixed results concerning their heritability, and ability to assess variation to the level of genomic data. The aim is to test further if such traits can approximate genetic relatedness, among continental and global samples. MATERIALS AND METHODS: First, for 12 African populations, Mantel correlations were calcul...
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#1Joel D. Irish (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)H-Index: 21
Objectives: Although rare, tooth transposition—an exchange in location of two teeth—is a frequent topic of study. Clinical and, to a much lesser extent, dental anthropological research have focused predominantly on prevalence (0.03%‐0.74% in several world populations) and case studies, albeit on a restricted spatiotemporal scale. Many regions have received little attention, including sub‐Saharan Africa, while premodern data are few. Here, the aim is to supplement both fields of dental research b...
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#1Ian Towle (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)H-Index: 3
#1Ian Towle (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)
Last. Joel D. Irish (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)H-Index: 21
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Abstract Enamel hypoplasia is often split into several macroscopic categories, including pit, localised, linear and plane-form defects. All types have been considered a sign of ‘non-specific stress’ during dental development in archaeological, as well as palaeoanthropological and other samples. There is growing evidence suggesting many defects may not be caused by illness or malnutrition during childhood, instead relating to trauma to the developing tooth, genetic conditions or specific environm...
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#1G. Richard Scott (UNR: University of Nevada, Reno)H-Index: 12
#2Joel D. Irish (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)H-Index: 21
Last. María Martinón-Torres (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 31
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Bailey et al. (1) describe a lower second molar with 3 roots in a Denisovan hemimandible dated 160,000 ka. The presence of a third root is stated to occur in <3.5% of non-Asians and in up to 40% of Asians and some New World populations. From this, they conclude the feature “provides morphological evidence of a strong link between archaic and recent Asian H[omo] sapiens populations. This link provides compelling evidence that modern Asian lineages acquired the 3-rooted lower molar via introgressi...
3 CitationsSource
#1Satu Valoriani (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)
#2Constantine Eliopoulos (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)H-Index: 9
Last. M Borrini (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)H-Index: 4
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#1Ian Towle (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)H-Index: 3
#2Joel D. Irish (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)H-Index: 21
Periapical lesions can develop after exposure of a tooth's pulp chamber and are commonly associated with heavy crown wear, trauma, or caries. In this study, maxilla and mandible fragments from the South African fossil hominin collections were studied, including specimens assigned to Homo naledi, Paranthropus robustus, Australopithecus africanus, and early Homo. Gorilla gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes, and Homo sapiens were also studied for comparative purposes. Only one fossil hominin specimen ...
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#1Juliet K Brophy (LSU: Louisiana State University)H-Index: 6
#2Joel D. Irish (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)H-Index: 21
Last. Lee R. Berger (University of the Witwatersrand)H-Index: 35
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Prior to the recovery of Homo naledi from the Dinaledi Chamber of the Rising Star Cave system, the Middle Pleistocene fossil record in Africa was particularly sparse. With the large sample size now available from Dinaledi, the opportunity exists to reassess taxonomically ambiguous teeth unearthed at the nearby site of Sterkfontein. Teeth recovered from Lincoln Cave South and area L/63 at Sterkfontein have been considered ‘most probably Homo ergaster’ and ‘perhaps Archaic Homo sapiens’, respectiv...
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#1Ian Towle (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)H-Index: 3
#2Joel D. Irish (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)H-Index: 21
Last. C. Fernee (UoB: University of Bristol)
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Caries frequencies in South African fossil hominins were observed and compared with other hominin samples. Species studied include Paranthropus robustus , Homo naledi , Australopithecus africanus , early Homo and A. sediba . Teeth were viewed macroscopically with Micro-CT scans used to confirm lesions. Position and severity of each lesion were also noted and described. For all South African fossil hominin specimens studied, 16 have carious lesions, six of which are described for the first time i...
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