Match!
Ken Catchpole
Medical University of South Carolina
111Publications
24H-index
2,734Citations
Publications 111
Newest
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Applied Ergonomics2.61
Ken Catchpole24
Estimated H-index: 24
(MUSC: Medical University of South Carolina),
Ann M. Bisantz20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UB: University at Buffalo)
+ 4 AuthorsJennifer T. Anger24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Cedars-Sinai Medical Center)
Abstract This article reviews studies conducted “in the wild” that explore the “ironies of automation” in Robotic Assisted Surgery (RAS). Workload may be reduced for the surgeon, but increased for other team members, with postural stress relocated rather than reduced, and the introduction of a range of new challenges, for example, in the need to control multiple arms, with multiple instruments; and the increased demands of being physically separated from the team. Workflow disruptions were not c...
Published on May 13, 2019in Health Informatics Journal2.30
Laura Schubel (MedStar Health), Danielle L Mosby (MedStar Health)+ 9 AuthorsElla Franklin2
Estimated H-index: 2
(MedStar Health)
In caring for patients with sepsis, the current structure of electronic health record systems allows clinical providers access to raw patient data without imputation of its significance. There are a wide range of sepsis alerts in clinical care that act as clinical decision support tools to assist in early recognition of sepsis; however, there are serious shortcomings in existing health information technology for alerting providers in a meaningful way. Little work has been done to evaluate and as...
Published on Apr 30, 2019in International Urogynecology Journal2.09
Colby P. Souders4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Ken Catchpole24
Estimated H-index: 24
+ 6 AuthorsMatthias Weigl20
Estimated H-index: 20
Introduction and hypothesis The purpose of this study was to apply a human factors research approach to identify flow disruptions, deviations in the optimal course of care, in robotic abdominal sacrocolpopexy procedures with the ultimate goal of developing system interventions to improve the safety and efficiency of robotic surgery.
Published on Apr 1, 2019in BMJ Quality & Safety7.04
Anjali Joseph7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Clemson University),
Amin Khoshkenar1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Clemson University)
+ 3 AuthorsSara Bayramzadeh3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Clemson University)
Background Studies in operating rooms (OR) show that minor disruptions tend to group together to result in serious adverse events such as surgical errors. Understanding the characteristics of these minor flow disruptions (FD) that impact major events is important in order to proactively design safer systems Objective The purpose of this study is to use a systems approach to investigate the aetiology of minor and major FDs in ORs in terms of the people involved, tasks performed and OR traffic, as...
Published on Nov 1, 2018in World Journal of Surgery2.77
Jeannette Weber1
Estimated H-index: 1
(LMU: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich),
Ken Catchpole24
Estimated H-index: 24
(MUSC: Medical University of South Carolina)
+ 2 AuthorsMatthias Weigl20
Estimated H-index: 20
(LMU: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)
Background Robotic systems introduced new surgical and technical demands. Surgical flow disruptions are critical for maintaining operating room (OR) teamwork and patient safety. Specifically for robotic surgery, effects of intra-operative disruptive events for OR professionals’ workload, stress, and performance have not been investigated yet. This study aimed to identify flow disruptions and assess their association with mental workload and performance during robotic-assisted surgery.
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Human Factors2.65
Katherina Jurewicz2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
David M. Neyens8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Clemson University)
+ 1 AuthorsScott Reeves61
Estimated H-index: 61
(MUSC: Medical University of South Carolina)
Objective:The purpose of this research was to compare gesture-function mappings for experts and novices using a 3D, vision-based, gestural input system when exposed to the same context of anesthesi...
Ken Catchpole24
Estimated H-index: 24
(MUSC: Medical University of South Carolina),
Myrtede Alfred1
Estimated H-index: 1
(MUSC: Medical University of South Carolina)
Quality and safety concerns in health care over the past 20 years precipitated the need to move beyond the traditional view of health care as an artisanal process toward a sociotechnical systems view of performance. The adoption of industrial approaches placed a greater emphasis on standardization of processes and outcomes, often treating humans as the “weak” part of the system rather than valuing their role in holding together complex, opaque, and unpredictable clinical systems. Although some h...
Published on Sep 1, 2018
Katherina Jurewicz2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Clemson University),
Myrtede Alfred1
Estimated H-index: 1
(MUSC: Medical University of South Carolina)
+ 3 AuthorsScott Reeves61
Estimated H-index: 61
(MUSC: Medical University of South Carolina)
Handoffs occur frequently in healthcare systems, and miscommunications and critical omissions within handoffs have been linked to serious medical errors. Handoff quality is a priority of patient safety initiatives across several international organizations. The majority of previous research in handoffs have focused on postoperative handoffs; yet, there is a need to specifically investigate intraoperative handoffs, especially within individual professions or subspecialties. Each subspecialty with...
Published on Sep 1, 2018
Danielle Weldon1
Estimated H-index: 1
(MedStar Health),
Rebecca Kowalski1
Estimated H-index: 1
(MedStar Health)
+ 9 AuthorsF.J. Seagull16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UM: University of Michigan)
Galinos Barmparas25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Cedars-Sinai Medical Center),
Eric J. Ley9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Cedars-Sinai Medical Center)
+ 5 AuthorsBruce L. Gewertz34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Cedars-Sinai Medical Center)
Background Trauma centers require reliable metrics to better compare the quality of care delivered. We compared mortality after a reported complication, termed failure to rescue (FTR), and FTR in the elderly (age >65 years) (FTRE) to determine which is a superior metric to assess quality of care delivered by trauma centers.
12345678910