Match!
Marianne Johnson
University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh
90Publications
9H-index
559Citations
Publications 90
Newest
#1Marianne JohnsonH-Index: 9
Source
#1Marianne Johnson (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)H-Index: 9
I present a brief history of modern public choice analysis as told through the lens of “rules versus authorities”, a dichotomy initially formulated by Henry C. Simons, University of Chicago professor to James M. Buchanan. Framing political decision-making as a choice between rules and authorities allows us to identify two necessary, motivating ideas for the emergence of public choice: (1) Governments are not monolithic, omniscient, social calculating machines, but are instead a collection of ind...
2 CitationsSource
#1Marianne Johnson (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)H-Index: 9
The career and contributions of Roy Blough (1901 – 2000) are considered as a case study of Wisconsin Institutionalism in government policy-making at mid-century. Faculty member at Cincinnati, Chicago and Columbia, editor of the National Tax Journal, director of the research division of the U.S. Treasury and member of the Council of Economic Advisors, Blough played a significant role in the development of fiscal policy. Considered are Blough’s contributions to tax policy and his views on Keynesia...
2 CitationsSource
#1Marianne Johnson (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)H-Index: 9
This chapter examines the origins of James M. Buchanan’s critique of Keynesian fiscal policy. Considered are Buchanan’s graduate training in public finance and fiscal policy and his early work in fiscal federalism. Two important themes emerge. The first is the influence of Henry C. Simons. The second relates to the necessity of choice between “rules versus authorities” or democratic process versus authoritarianism in policy making. Beginning with his 1948 dissertation, Buchanan consistently emph...
1 CitationsSource
#1Benjamin ArtzH-Index: 8
#2Marianne JohnsonH-Index: 9
Last.Sarinda TaengnoiH-Index: 2
view all 4 authors...
Source
#1Marianne JohnsonH-Index: 9
In this chapter, I examine the education, careers, and professional contributions of women who trained in economics at the University Wisconsin during the Commons Era, including Helen Sumner Woodbury, Theresa Schmid McMahon, Elizabeth Brandeis Raushenbush, and Elizabeth Paschal. Despite several of masterful studies of Wisconsin Institutionalism (Kaufman 1993; Robert Lampman 1993; Rutherford 2011), the women of Wisconsin have received remarkably little consideration. Synthesizing the experiences ...
Source
#1Marianne JohnsonH-Index: 9
Source
Source
Source
Source
123456789