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Karen N. Pelletreau
University of Connecticut
3Publications
3H-index
73Citations
Publications 3
Newest
Published on Jul 1, 2015in Scientific Reports 4.01
Sónia Cruz13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Paulo Cartaxana18
Estimated H-index: 18
+ 5 AuthorsMary E. Rumpho19
Estimated H-index: 19
Some sea slugs are capable of retaining functional sequestered chloroplasts (kleptoplasts) for variable periods of time. The mechanisms supporting the maintenance of these organelles in animal hosts are still largely unknown. Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and the occurrence of a xanthophyll cycle were investigated in the sea slugs Elysia viridis and E. chlorotica using chlorophyll fluorescence measurements and pigment analysis. The photoprotective capacity of kleptoplasts was compared to tha...
Published on May 14, 2014in PLOS ONE 2.78
Karen N. Pelletreau3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UConn: University of Connecticut),
Andreas P. M. Weber58
Estimated H-index: 58
+ 1 AuthorsMary E. Rumpho19
Estimated H-index: 19
The establishment of kleptoplasty (retention of ‘‘stolen plastids’’) in the digestive tissue of the sacoglossan Elysia chlorotica Gould was investigated using transmission electron microscopy. Cellular processes occurring during the initial exposure to plastids were observed in laboratory raised animals ranging from 1–14 days post metamorphosis (dpm). These observations revealed an abundance of lipid droplets (LDs) correlating to plastid abundance. Starvation of animals resulted in LD and plasti...
Published on Aug 1, 2013in Molecular Biology and Evolution 14.80
Debashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
(RU: Rutgers University),
Karen N. Pelletreau3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UMaine: University of Maine)
+ 2 AuthorsMary E. Rumpho6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UMaine: University of Maine)
The sea slug Elysia chlorotica offers a unique opportunity to study the evolution of a novel function (photosynthesis) in a complex multicellular host. Elysia chlorotica harvests plastids (absent of nuclei) from its heterokont algal prey, Vaucheria litorea. The “stolen” plastids are maintained for several months in cells of the digestive tract and are essential for animal development. The basis of long-term maintenance of photosynthesis in this sea slug was thought to be explained by extensive h...
Published on Dec 1, 2012in Symbiosis 2.01
Karen N. Pelletreau3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UMaine: University of Maine),
Jared M. Worful4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UMaine: University of Maine)
+ 1 AuthorsMary E. Rumpho6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UMaine: University of Maine)
The kleptoplastic sacoglossan Elysia chlorotica shares a requisite, intracellular symbiosis with the plastids (= chloroplasts) of the Xanthophyte alga Vaucheria litorea. Although wild specimens have been used to address a range of biological questions, no studies have thoroughly characterized animal development during the initial establishment of the symbiosis under controlled laboratory conditions. Laboratory culture conditions were modified and the time required for successful metamorphosis wa...
Published on Apr 1, 2011in Plant Physiology 6.30
Karen N. Pelletreau6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Debashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
+ 3 AuthorsMary E. Rumpho1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Maine System)
[Trench (1969)][1] was the first to characterize the kleptoplastic (i.e. “stolen plastid”) relationship between the sacoglossan mollusc Elysia chlorotica and its algal prey ( Vaucheria litorea ). In contrast to E. chlorotica , which retains only the plastids of the alga in densely packed
Published on Jan 15, 2011in The Journal of Experimental Biology 3.02
Mary E. Rumpho19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
Karen N. Pelletreau6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 1 AuthorsDebashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
Summary Symbiotic animals containing green photobionts challenge the common perception that only plants are capable of capturing the sun9s rays and converting them into biological energy through photoautotrophic CO 2 fixation (photosynthesis). ‘Solar-powered’ sacoglossan molluscs, or sea slugs, have taken this type of symbiotic association one step further by solely harboring the photosynthetic organelle, the plastid (=chloroplast). One such sea slug, Elysia chlorotica , lives as a ‘plant’ when ...
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