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M. Jane Heinig
University of California, Davis
ObstetricsNursingBreastfeedingLactationMedicine
83Publications
18H-index
4,056Citations
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Publications 84
Newest
#1Heather Wasser (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 5
#2Amanda L. Thompson (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 16
Last. Margaret E. Bentley (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 48
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Abstract Objective Our goal is to test the efficacy of a family-based, multi-component intervention focused on infants of African-American (AA) mothers and families, a minority population at elevated risk for pediatric obesity, versus a child safety attention-control group to promote healthy weight gain patterns during the first two years of life. Design, participants, and methods The design is a two-group randomized controlled trial among 468 AA pregnant women in central North Carolina. Mothers...
2 CitationsSource
#1Heather Wasser (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 5
#2M. Jane Heinig (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 18
Last. Kristin P. Tully (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 8
view all 3 authors...
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#1Katie DaMotaH-Index: 1
#2Jennifer BañuelosH-Index: 3
Last. M. Jane Heinig (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 18
view all 5 authors...
Background:While hospital policies and medical issues are important factors in determining exclusive breastfeeding rates, medically unnecessary supplementation of infants is likely to be due, in part, to maternal request for formula.Objectives:The goal of this project was to gain an understanding of the facilitating factors and decision-making processes surrounding maternal request for formula in the early postpartum period.Methods:A series of 12 focus groups were conducted among 97 English- and...
39 CitationsSource
#1Katie DaMotaH-Index: 1
#2Jennifer BañuelosH-Index: 3
Last. M. Jane HeinigH-Index: 18
view all 5 authors...
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Over the last few years, funding for preventative interventions and public health programs has steadily declined, resulting in severely limited resources for services and positions. Breastfeeding has been particularly hard hit in many areas, sending many lactation professionals scrambling to find or maintain positions. In this environment, the idea that any of the limited funding should be used to support the evaluation of interventions may seem counterintuitive. However, in the deepest recessio...
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359 As a researcher, I use data every day to make decisions, create reports, write grants, and teach my classes. As Journal of Human Lactation readers, you use the data published in the journal to assist with decision making and to ensure that you are up-to-date with evidencebased practices. You may not be aware that data can also be used to drive and shape change within your institutions, communities, and government agencies. As we move further into this global age of “accountability,” it will ...
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13 CitationsSource
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