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Rhonda Oliver
Curtin University
PsychologyLanguage assessmentSecond-language acquisitionPedagogyLinguistics
91Publications
18H-index
2,100Citations
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Publications 107
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#1Agurtzane Azkarai (UPV/EHU: University of the Basque Country)H-Index: 5
#2María del Pilar García Mayo (UPV/EHU: University of the Basque Country)H-Index: 15
Last. Rhonda Oliver (Curtin University)H-Index: 18
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Abstract Research on collaborative work has explored the benefits of task repetition (TR) for L2 development. TR has been claimed to improve L2 complexity, accuracy and fluency, provide opportunities for feedback, and increase learners’ engagement in their L2, as reported in studies that have explored patterns of interaction. Research on this topic, particularly that undertaken with EFL children as participants, has gained attention in recent years. However, there is a dearth of literature regar...
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ABSTRACTEight adult Aboriginal people residing in a remote community in the north-west of Australia participated in this research. The data were collected from an ‘inside’ perspective and, as cultu...
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#1Carly Steele (Curtin University)
#2Rhonda Oliver (Curtin University)H-Index: 18
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#1Agurtzane Azkarai (UPV/EHU: University of the Basque Country)H-Index: 5
#2Rhonda Oliver (Curtin University)H-Index: 18
ABSTRACTResearch on task repetition in second language (L2) learning has shown the benefits of this practice for subsequent L2 learning. However, as with much L2 research, most studies on task repetition have focused on adults and there is a dearth of research in this area involving young children. This study examines the effect of task repetition on two forms of negative feedback (NF), recasts and negotiation of meaning (NoM) strategies, available to children in an English as a second language ...
4 CitationsSource
#1Rhonda Oliver (Curtin University)H-Index: 18
#2Agurtzane Azkarai (UPV/EHU: University of the Basque Country)H-Index: 5
Abstract Previous research carried out from a socio-cultural perspective has explored the way adult learners interact when undertaking tasks. Following the type of analysis initiated by Storch (2002) we examined the patterns of interaction of young ESL learners (ages 9–12) of different English proficiency levels, high-intermediate (H) and low-intermediate (L) as they worked with native speakers (NS) (i.e., H/NS and L/NS pairs) to carry out a one-way and a two-way task. Once the patterns of inter...
1 CitationsSource
#1Rhonda Oliver (Curtin University)H-Index: 18
#2Helen Cd McCarthy (Curtin University)
This chapter describes the translanguaging practices of young Aboriginal adults when they use the social media site Facebook. It is apparent that their language use in this medium reflects the complex and diverse nature of their language backgrounds. Specifically, they use their range of linguistic resources, including traditional language words and Aboriginal English forms along with Standard Australian English, according to context and topic to successfully communicate with their audience abou...
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#1Rhonda Oliver (Curtin University)H-Index: 18
#2Tatiana Bogachenko (Curtin University)H-Index: 1
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#1Junko Iwasaki (ECU: Edith Cowan University)H-Index: 1
#2Rhonda Oliver (Curtin University)H-Index: 18
This longitudinal case study reports on the acquisition of Japanese as a second language (L2) by a child learner with English as his first language (L1) who was acquiring Japanese naturalistically. In particular this study focusses on the acquisition by the child of a non-canonical mapping structure, namely the passive voice in relation to canonical mapping structures (e.g., the active voice) within the framework of the Unmarked Alignment Hypothesis (UAH) and the Lexical Mapping Hypothesis (LMH)...
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#1Agurtzane AzkaraiH-Index: 5
#2Rhonda OliverH-Index: 18
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