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Kenneth J. Smith
University of Pittsburgh
SurgeryIntensive care medicineVaccinationCost-effectiveness analysisMedicine
211Publications
27H-index
2,567Citations
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Publications 260
Newest
#1Michael G. Cohen (University of Pittsburgh)
#2Andrew D. Althouse (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 17
Last. Yael Schenker (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 12
view all 9 authors...
PURPOSE:Providers have cited fear of taking away hope from patients as one of the principal reasons for deferring advance care planning (ACP). However, research is lacking on the relationship betwe...
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#1Kathleen A. Noorbakhsh (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 1
#2Rachel P. Berger (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 35
Last. Kenneth J. Smith (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 27
view all 3 authors...
OBJECTIVES To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of abusive head trauma detection strategies in emergency department (ED) settings with and without rapid magnetic resonance imaging (rMRI) availability. STUDY DESIGN A Markov decision model estimated outcomes in well-appearing infants with high-risk chief complaints. In an ED without rMRI, we considered 3 strategies: clinical judgment, universal head computed tomography (CT), or Pittsburgh Infant Brain Injury Score (PIBIS) with CT. In an ED with rMRI...
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#1Vikram K. Raghu (Boston Children's Hospital)
#2Jeffrey A. Rudolph (Boston Children's Hospital)H-Index: 15
Last. Kenneth J. Smith (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 27
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BACKGROUND Children with chronic intestinal failure have a high prevalence of anemia, commonly from iron deficiency, leading to frequent blood transfusions. No current guideline exists for iron supplementation in these children. In this analysis, we evaluate the effectiveness and the cost-effectiveness of using parenteral, enteral, and no iron supplementation to reduce blood transfusions. METHODS We created a microsimulation model of pediatric intestinal failure over a 1-year time horizon. Model...
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#1Chester B. GoodH-Index: 29
#2Inmaculada Hernandez (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 9
Last. Kenneth J. Smith (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 27
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#1Daniel J. Buysse (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 89
#2Lee M. Ritterband (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 33
Last. C M Patterson (University of Pittsburgh)
view all 7 authors...
Source
#1Seyi D Eletu (PHE: Public Health England)H-Index: 2
#2Carmen L. Sheppard (PHE: Public Health England)H-Index: 19
Last. Norman K. Fry (PHE: Public Health England)H-Index: 37
view all 8 authors...
National surveillance of pneumococcal disease at the serotype level is essential to assess the effectiveness of vaccination programmes. We previously developed a highly sensitive extended-specificity multiplex immunoassay for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype-specific antigen in urine in the absence of isolates. The assay uses human mAbs that detect the 24 pneumococcal serotype/groups targeted by the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV...
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#1Angela R. Wateska (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 16
#2Mary Patricia Nowalk (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 36
Last. Kenneth J. Smith (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 27
view all 7 authors...
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Recently revised vaccination recommendations for US adults, aged 65 years and older, include both 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), with PCV13 now recommended for immunocompetent older people based on shared decision making. The public health impact and cost-effectiveness of this recommendation or of pneumococcal vaccine uptake improvement interventions are unclear. DESIGN: Markov decision analysis....
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#1Angela R. Wateska (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 16
#2Mary Patricia Nowalk (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 36
Last. Kenneth J. Smith (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 27
view all 7 authors...
In US adults aged < 65 years, pneumococcal vaccination is recommended when high-risk conditions are present, but vaccine uptake is low. Additionally, there are race-based differences in illness risk and vaccination rates. The cost-effectiveness of programs to improve vaccine uptake or of alternative vaccination policies to increase protection is unclear. A decision analysis compared, in US black and general population cohorts aged 50 years, the public health impact and cost-effectiveness of pneu...
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#1Angela R. Wateska (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 16
#2Mary Patricia Nowalk (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 36
Last. Kenneth J. Smith (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 27
view all 7 authors...
Introduction Recommending both the conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines to all U.S. seniors may have little public health impact and be economically unreasonable. Public health impact and cost-effectiveness of using both vaccines in all adults aged ≥65 years were estimated compared with an alternative strategy (omitting pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the nonimmunocompromised) and with the newly revised recommendation (giving or omitting conjugate vaccine based on patient–physici...
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#1Nader Shaikh (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 24
#2Vinod Rajakumar (Boston Children's Hospital)H-Index: 1
Last. Alejandro Hoberman (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 37
view all 14 authors...
Objective: Antimicrobial prophylaxis for children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) reduces recurrences of urinary tract infection (UTI) but requires daily antimicrobials for extended periods. We used a cost-utility model to evaluate whether the benefits of antimicrobial prophylaxis outweigh its risks and, if so, to investigate whether the benefits and risks vary according to grade of VUR. Methods: We compared the cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained in four treatment strategies in c...
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