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Duane C. Button
Memorial University of Newfoundland
70Publications
20H-index
1,535Citations
Publications 70
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#1Duane C. Button (St. John's University)H-Index: 20
#2Jayne M. Kalmar (WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)H-Index: 8
Spinal motoneurons (MN) exhibit exercise-dependent adaptations to increased activity, such as exercise and locomotion, as well as decreased activity associated with disuse, spinal cord injury, and ...
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#1Behzad Lahouti (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)
#2Evan J. Lockyer (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)H-Index: 2
Last.Duane C. Button (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)H-Index: 20
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The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic resistance training on corticospinal excitability and short intracortical inhibition of the biceps brachii. Eight chronic resistance-trained (RT) and eight non-RT participants completed one experimental session including a total of 30 brief (7 s) elbow flexors isometric contractions at various force outputs [15, 25 and 40% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)]. Before the contractions, MVC, maximal compound muscle action poten...
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#1Lynsey R. Alcock (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)H-Index: 2
#2Alyssa-Joy Spence (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)H-Index: 3
Last.Kevin E. Power (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)H-Index: 13
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We have previously shown that supraspinal excitability is higher during arm cycling than a position- and intensity-matched tonic contraction. The present study sought to determine if short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) was present during arm cycling and if so, if the amount of SICI was different from an intensity-matched tonic contraction. SICI was assessed using conditioning stimuli (CS) of 70 and 90% of active motor threshold (AMT) and a test stimulus (TS) of 120% AMT at an intersti...
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#1Evan J. LockyerH-Index: 2
Last.Kevin E. PowerH-Index: 13
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Background: We examined corticospinal and spinal excitability across multiple power outputs during arm cycling using a weak and strong stimulus intensity. Methods: We elicited motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and cervicomedullary motor evoked potentials (CMEPs) in the biceps brachii using magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex and electrical stimulation of corticospinal axons during arm cycling at six different power outputs (i.e., 25, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250 W) and two stimulation intensiti...
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#2Evan J. LockyerH-Index: 2
Last.Kevin E. PowerH-Index: 2
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The purpose of this study was to evaluate corticospinal excitability to the biceps and triceps brachii during forward (FWD) and backward (BWD) arm cycling. Corticospinal and spinal excitability wer...
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#1Evan J. LockyerH-Index: 2
Last.Kevin E. PowerH-Index: 13
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Background: The present study compared corticospinal excitability to the biceps brachii muscle during arm cycling at a self-selected and a fixed cadence (SSC and FC, respectively). We hypothesized that corticospinal excitability would not be different between the two conditions. Methods: The SSC was initially performed and the cycling cadence was recorded every 5 s for one minute. The average cadence of the SSC cycling trial was then used as a target for the FC of cycling that the participants w...
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#1Davis A. Forman (UOIT: University of Ontario Institute of Technology)H-Index: 7
#2Garrick N. Forman (Brock University)
Last.Michael W.R. Holmes (Brock University)H-Index: 1
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