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Emilio Balletto
University of Turin
EcologyMyrmicaButterflyBiologyZoology
131Publications
19H-index
1,158Citations
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Publications 152
Newest
#1Stefano ScalercioH-Index: 10
#2Alessandro Cini (UniFI: University of Florence)H-Index: 14
Last. Roger Vila (UPF: Pompeu Fabra University)H-Index: 28
view all 11 authors...
Populations inhabiting Mediterranean islands often show contrasting genetic lineages, even on islands that were connected to the mainland during glacial maxima. This pattern is generated by forces acting in historical and contemporary times. Understanding these phenomena requires comparative studies integrating genetic structure, functional traits and dispersal constraints. Using as a model the butterfly species living across the Messina strait (3 km wide) separating Sicily from the Italian Peni...
1 CitationsSource
#1Luca Pietro Casacci (Museum and Institute of Zoology)
#2Simona BonelliH-Index: 15
Last. Francesca BarberoH-Index: 15
view all 4 authors...
Ant nests and their surrounding territories represent a hoard of trophic resources, as well as of stable and protected environments for many arthropods involved in commensal, mutualistic or parasitic associations. Among these organisms, called myrmecophiles, several are butterflies. Here, we explore the amazing diversity of strategies developed by myrmecophilous butterflies to “cheat” or manipulate ants and to elude the tough defenses of the colony. During oviposition, female butterflies use vis...
Source
#1Leonardo Dapporto (UniFI: University of Florence)H-Index: 27
#2Alessandro Cini (UniFI: University of Florence)H-Index: 14
Last. Roger Vila (UPF: Pompeu Fabra University)H-Index: 28
view all 14 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1András Tartally (UCPH: University of Copenhagen)H-Index: 12
#2Jeremy A. Thomas (University of Oxford)H-Index: 39
Last. David R. Nash (UCPH: University of Copenhagen)H-Index: 21
view all 40 authors...
The range of hosts exploited by a parasite is determined by several factors, including host availability, infectivity and exploitability. Each of these can be the target of natural selection on bot...
8 CitationsSource
#1Luca Pietro Casacci (UNITO: University of Turin)H-Index: 10
#2Karsten SchönroggeH-Index: 32
Last. Francesca Barbero (UNITO: University of Turin)H-Index: 15
view all 6 authors...
In natural ecosystems, relationships between organisms are often characterised by high levels of complexity, where vulnerabilities in multi-trophic systems are difficult to identify, yet variation in specific community modules can be traceable. Within the complex community interactions, we can shed new light on dynamics by which co-evolutionary outcomes can inform science-led conservation. Here we assessed host-ant use in six populations of the butterfly Phengaris (=Maculinea) rebeli, an obligat...
4 CitationsSource
#1Martin Wiemers (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ)H-Index: 17
#2Emilio Balletto (UNITO: University of Turin)H-Index: 19
Last. Rudi Verovnik (University of Ljubljana)H-Index: 15
view all 12 authors...
This paper presents an updated checklist of the butterflies of Europe, together with their original name combinations, and their occurrence status in each European country. According to this checklist, 496 species of the superfamily Papilionoidea occur in Europe. Changes in comparison with the last version (2.6.2) of Fauna Europaea are discussed. Compared to that version, 16 species are new additions, either due to cryptic species most of which have been discovered by molecular methods (13 cases...
4 CitationsSource
#1Emilio Balletto (UNITO: University of Turin)H-Index: 19
#2Francesca Barbero (UNITO: University of Turin)H-Index: 15
Last. Leonardo Dapporto (UniFI: University of Florence)H-Index: 27
view all 5 authors...
The purpose of this application, under Articles 41 and 65.2 of the Code, is to conserve the well-established current use of the hesperiid tribe Erynnini Brues & Melander, 1932 (subfamily Pyrginae) by suppressing its three senior homonyms Erynnidi Tutt, 1906, Erynnidae Swinhoe, 1913, and Erynnidae Hampson, 1918, which were based on the same genus Erynnis Schrank, 1801, the last based on many distinct and invalidly fixed type species.
Source
#1Silvia Ghidotti (University of Milano-Bicocca)H-Index: 1
#2Cristiana CerratoH-Index: 5
Last. Simona Bonelli (UNITO: University of Turin)H-Index: 15
view all 13 authors...
Butterflies of the European Euphydryas aurinia complex include a series of taxa, showing morphological and eco-ethological differences. All of them are threatened by changes in land use affecting both the structural and functional connectivity of habitat patches, as well as habitat quality. In this framework, we analysed the use of resources by two of the three taxa occurring in Italy, E. (a.) glaciegenita (Alpine) and E. (a.) provincialis (Mediterranean), at ‘landscape’, ‘patch’ and ‘microhabit...
Source
#1Simona Bonelli (UNITO: University of Turin)H-Index: 15
#2Luca Pietro Casacci (UNITO: University of Turin)H-Index: 10
Last. Emilio Balletto (UNITO: University of Turin)H-Index: 19
view all 12 authors...
6 CitationsSource
#1Leonardo Dapporto (UniFI: University of Florence)H-Index: 27
#2Alessandro Cini (UniFI: University of Florence)H-Index: 14
Last. Roger Vila (UPF: Pompeu Fabra University)H-Index: 28
view all 18 authors...
Aim We describe fine-scale diversity patterns of the entire butterfly fauna occurring on the Tuscan Archipelago. By assessing the traits associated with population diversification, haplotype uniqueness and extinction, we aim to identify the factors determining the origin and maintenance of genetic diversity, and population vulnerability to environmental changes. Location Tuscan Archipelago, Sardinia, Tuscany (Italy) and Corsica (France). Methods We built a mtDNA dataset (1,303 COI sequences) for...
8 CitationsSource
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