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Erika Westling
Oregon Research Institute
20Publications
8H-index
234Citations
Publications 20
Newest
#1Julie C. Rusby (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 13
#2Erika Westling (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 8
Last.John M. Light (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 12
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Objective To date, research investigating the association between adolescent marijuana use and anxiety is mixed, given differences in how anxiety is measured and the age ranges studied. The research is further limited as many relevant studies have small sample sizes. This investigation examines the association between marijuana use (use in the past 30 days) and anxious mood lability (rapid fluctuation in emotional states) during early adolescence (average age 14.4, spring of 8th grade) ...
#1John M. Light (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 12
#2Kathryn L. Mills (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 16
Last.Erika Westling (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 8
view all 4 authors...
Objective:Heavy alcohol consumption has both immediate and longer-term risks for adolescents. Using a dynamic network modeling approach, this study investigated the role of adult supervision and af...
#1Anthony Biglan (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 51
#2Mark J. Van Ryzin (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 20
Last.Erika Westling (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 8
view all 3 authors...
Cross-sectional, longitudinal, and experimental studies have found a link between youth exposure to cigarette marketing and youth initiation of smoking. These decisive research findings led to regulations of cigarette marketing to youth—including no television or radio ads, prohibitions on the use of cartoons, bans on transit and billboard advertisements, and disallowing tobacco brand sponsorships of sporting events or concerts. Similar products that may cause more harm than benefits include alc...
#1Julie C. Rusby (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 13
#2Michael J. Mason (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 19
Last.Brian R. Flay (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 76
view all 9 authors...
Abstract Introduction Experiencing relational victimization (e.g., peer exclusion, untrue rumors) during adolescence can have negative social–emotional consequences, including increased antisocial behavior and substance use. The negative impact of relational victimization may be lessened by spending time with supportive, prosocial peers. Methods This study examined the concurrent and predictive associations between relational victimization and peer affiliates' prosocial behaviors in 244 predomin...
#1Nikola Zaharakis (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 9
#2Michael J. Mason (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 19
Last.Thomas Way (Villanova University)H-Index: 14
view all 9 authors...
The school environment is extremely salient in young adolescents’ lives. Adolescents who have unfavorable attitudes toward school and teachers are at elevated risk for dropping out of school and engaging in behavioral health risks. Peer network health—a summation of the positive and negative behaviors in which one’s close friend group engages—may be one way by which attitudes toward school exert influence on youth substance use. Utilizing a sample of 248 primarily African-American young urban ad...
#1Julie C. Rusby (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 13
#2John M. Light (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 12
Last.Erika Westling (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 8
view all 4 authors...
#1Michael J. Mason (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 19
#2Nikola Zaharakis (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 9
Last.Brian R. Flay (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 76
view all 7 authors...
#1Michael J. Mason (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 19
#2John M. Light (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 12
Last.Brian R. Flay (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 76
view all 9 authors...
Abstract Background The current study investigated the moderating effect of peer networks on neighborhood disorder’s association with substance use in a sample of primarily African American urban adolescents. Methods A convenience sample of 248 adolescents was recruited from urban health care settings and followed for two years, assessing psychological, social, and geographic risk and protective characteristics. A subset of 106 substance using participants were used for the analyses. A moderatio...
#1Erika Westling (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 8
#2Julie C. Rusby (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 13
Last.John M. Light (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 12
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Purpose The aim of this study was to examine the use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) among adolescents over time, including correlates of lifetime use by eighth grade and trajectories of current use across ninth grade. Methods Participants (N = 1,091) from seven school districts in Oregon, United States, completed four self-report surveys on substance use, from the spring of eighth grade (M age = 14.4 years old; standard deviation = .50) through the spring of ninth grade. Result...
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