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Antonio J. C. Aguiar
University of Brasília
14Publications
5H-index
125Citations
Publications 14
Newest
Published on Jul 1, 2017in Flora 1.42
Florian Etl3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Vienna),
Anna Franschitz1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Vienna)
+ 2 AuthorsStefan Dötterl31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of Salzburg)
Abstract It has been known since Stefan Vogel’s observations in 1969 that solitary female oil bees collect fatty floral oils from specialized oil-secreting plants with the aid of hairy patches on either their legs or abdomen, a reward used as food for their larvae and/or to line their brood cells. Similar adaptations are also known from male oil bees, although the purpose of their oil-collecting behavior has not yet been clarified. Here, we describe a novel pollination system involving male Para...
Published on Aug 1, 2015in Flora 1.42
Liedson Tavares Carneiro2
Estimated H-index: 2
(USP: University of São Paulo),
Antonio J. C. Aguiar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UnB: University of Brasília)
+ 2 AuthorsIsabel Alves-dos-Santos14
Estimated H-index: 14
(USP: University of São Paulo)
Abstract Oil flowers are spread over eleven angiosperm families and exploited by bees specialized on oil gathering. This reward is produced by glandular surfaces of specific floral whorls called elaiophores. Unlike trichome elaiophores, such as those of Plantaginaceae, Krameria species bear lateral petals modified into epithelial elaiophore, convergently similar to oil-secreting Malpighiaceae calyx. Krameriaceae is an oil-offering monotypic group of eighteen species with little information on th...
Published on Nov 1, 2013in Apidologie 2.25
Daniel Paiva Silva11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UFG: Universidade Federal de Goiás),
Antonio J. C. Aguiar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UnB: University of Brasília)
+ 2 AuthorsPaulo De Marco24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UFG: Universidade Federal de Goiás)
Given human-related changes, quality distributional data are required for consistent conservation. Still, the lack of proper biogeographic information is a major setback for many groups. Here, we use new occurrences for Aglae caerulea in the Cerrado to model its potential distribution. We used Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) and Genetic Algorithm for Rule-Set Production (GARP) algorithms in different modeling runs and both previous and new A. caerulea occurrences to predict this species distribution. M...
Published on Jul 1, 2013in Flora 1.42
Aline C. Martins7
Estimated H-index: 7
(FFCLRP: Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto),
Antonio J. C. Aguiar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UnB: University of Brasília),
Isabel Alves-dos-Santos14
Estimated H-index: 14
(USP: University of São Paulo)
Abstract Oil-bee/oil-flower mutualism evolved through multiple gains and losses of the ability to produce floral oil in plants and to collect it in bees. Around 2000 plant species are known to produce floral oils that are collected by roughly 450 bee species, which use them for the construction of nests and for the larval food. The Plantaginaceae contain several Neotropical species that produce floral oils, the main reward offered by these plants. In the genera Angelonia , Basistemon , Monopera ...
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Apidologie 2.25
Simone C. Cappellari4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Texas at Austin),
Gabriel A. R. Melo18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UFPR: Federal University of Paraná)
+ 1 AuthorsJohn L. Neff11
Estimated H-index: 11
Several groups of solitary bees, known as oil-collecting bees, gather lipids from flowers that offer them as their main reward to pollinators. In the Neotropical region, oil-collecting bees belong to the tribes Centridini, Tapinotaspidini, and Tetrapediini (Apidae: Apinae). The floral oils collected by females of these groups are used as larval food or in nest construction. The interaction of these bees with oil flowers is characterized by the presence of specialized structures for oil collectio...
Published on Dec 1, 2011in Biota Neotropica 1.28
Maria Cristina Gaglianone10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Antonio J. C. Aguiar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UnB: University of Brasília)
+ 1 AuthorsIsabel Alves-dos-Santos14
Estimated H-index: 14
(USP: University of São Paulo)
In this study a current list of the oil-collecting bees from Sao Paulo State is presented, with their occurrences associated to the mainly biomes of the state: Atlantic Rainforest and Cerrado. Some data on the biology of the common species are presented. We discuss about the sample gaps for the state.
Published on Jun 1, 2011in Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 2.91
Antonio J. C. Aguiar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UnB: University of Brasília),
Gabriel A. R. Melo18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UFPR: Federal University of Paraná)
The bee genus Paratetrapedia represents a commonly collected group of bees and is especially diverse in forested areas of the Neotropics. Its taxonomy has remained poorly understood because of a lack of modern revisionary work and numerous species described as Tetrapedia whose type specimens have not been re-examined in recent times. Here, a comprehensive study was carried out to review the taxonomy of the genus Paratetrapedia and to investigate cladistically the relationships amongst its specie...
Published on Jan 1, 2009in Zootaxa 0.99
Antonio J. C. Aguiar5
Estimated H-index: 5
In the present study the genus Lophopedia is taxonomically revised. Thirteen species are recognized as valid, including five new species: Lophopedia apicalis (Cresson), L. buchwaldi (Cockerell), L. flava (Smith), L. fulviventris sp. nov., L. haeckeli (Friese), L. klugi (Friese), L. minor sp. nov., L. nigriceps (Friese), L. nigrispinis (Vachal), L. paraensis sp. nov., L. pulchra sp. nov., L. pygmaea (Schrottky), L. savanicola sp. nov. Three new synonymies are recognized: Lophopedia apicalis (Cres...
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