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Michael Flood
Queensland University of Technology
Gender studiesPsychologyPolitical scienceDomestic violenceSocial psychology
132Publications
21H-index
2,238Citations
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#1Kenton Bell (UOW: University of Wollongong)H-Index: 2
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How does men’s participation in the social movement to prevent violence against women change their relationships with other men and with women? How does it affect their understanding and practices of masculinity? This chapter offers a case study of White Ribbon Australia’s Ambassador Program, which involves men as public anti-violence advocates, inviting them to ‘stand up, speak out and act’ to influence other men’s attitudes and behaviours towards women. Drawing on an online survey (n = 296), c...
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#1Isabela Burgher (ANU: Australian National University)H-Index: 1
#2Michael Flood (QUT: Queensland University of Technology)H-Index: 21
ABSTRACTViewed as strategic for achieving gender equality, involved fatherhood and the relationship between caregiving and masculinity are increasingly a focus of research. Qualitative research amo...
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#1Michael Flood (QUT: Queensland University of Technology)H-Index: 21
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#1Stephen R. Burrell (Durham University)H-Index: 1
#2Michael Flood (QUT: Queensland University of Technology)H-Index: 21
Much of the work to engage men in preventing violence against women across the globe is profeminist—it is informed by feminist perspectives and done by or in collaboration with women and women’s organisations. Men involved in this work typically are expected to support feminism and to be accountable to women and feminism. But which feminism should profeminist men support? There has been relatively little discussion of this question in the ‘engaging men’ field. Yet, organisations and individuals ...
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#1Michael Flood (QUT: Queensland University of Technology)H-Index: 21
This chapter argues that engaging men and boys is part of the solution to men’s violence against women. It identifies a compelling rationale for addressing men in ending violence against women: it is largely men who perpetrate this violence, constructions of masculinity play a crucial role in shaping violence against women, and more hopefully, men and boys have a positive role to play in helping to stop violence against women. There are also tensions and critiques regarding this rationale. Flood...
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#1Michael Flood (QUT: Queensland University of Technology)H-Index: 21
Men’s responses to #MeToo range from enthusiastic support to hostile backlash. There are common forms of resistance among men to campaigns relating to gender-based violence, including defensive denials that men’s violence is routine (#NotAllMen), counter-calls to address women’s violence against men, and complaints that #MeToo has ‘gone too far’ and become a ‘witch-hunt’. And for many men, there is simply mute discomfort. Masculinity is implicated directly in men’s perpetration of rape and sexua...
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#1Michael Flood (QUT: Queensland University of Technology)H-Index: 21
Part II explores the strategies and settings which can be used to engage men and boys in preventing and reducing violence against women. It begins with the general challenge of making the project of preventing and reducing violence against women relevant and meaningful for men. This chapter begins with where men and boys stand: the extent to which men actually perpetrate violence against women, men’s attitudes towards this violence, and men’s beliefs and practices when it comes to speaking up or...
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#1Michael Flood (QUT: Queensland University of Technology)H-Index: 21
A persistent challenge in anti-violence work with men and boys is resistance. Men and boys often respond in hostile or defensive ways to violence prevention efforts, and Chapter 10 explores the ways in which to minimise these. It begins by outlining a range of strategies aimed at lessening men’s and boys’ ideological hostility to gender justice and violence prevention advocacy. These include strategies to do with content, on the one hand, such as personalising women’s disadvantage, making analog...
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#1Michael Flood (QUT: Queensland University of Technology)H-Index: 21
The last chapter in this section of the book on strategies and settings, examines violence prevention efforts among men and boys which take place in workplaces and other institutions. It works across two overlapping forms of prevention activity: educating men at work and/or as professionals, on the one hand, and changing organisations, on the other. The former includes interventions with particular groups of providers or professionals, often in male-dominated occupations such as police, faith le...
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