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Daisy Fancourt
University College London
Mental healthPsychologyPsychological interventionSingingMedicine
69Publications
8H-index
291Citations
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Publications 92
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#1Sarah E. Jackson (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 17
#2Jamie Brown (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 27
Last. Daisy Fancourt (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 8
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Objectives: To examine associations between smoking and COVID-19 relevant outcomes, taking into account the influence of inequalities and adjusting for potential confounding variables. Design: Online cross-sectional survey. Setting: UK. Participants: 53,002 men and women aged ≥18y. Main outcome measures: Confirmed and suspected COVID-19, worry about catching and becoming seriously ill from COVID-19, and adherence to protective behaviours. Socioeconomic position was defined according to highest l...
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#1Feifei Bu (UCL: University College London)
#2Keir Elmslie James Philip (Imperial College London)
Last. Daisy Fancourt (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 8
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Rising hospital admissions due to respiratory disease (RD) are a major challenge to hospitals. This study explored modifiable social risk factors among 4478 older adults from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Data were linked with administrative hospital records and mortality registry data (follow-up 9.6 years) and analysed using survival analysis accounting for competing risks. Living alone and social disengagement but not social contact or loneliness were associated with an increased r...
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The sense that one is living a meaningful life is associated with positive health outcomes, but less is known about the role of changes in sense of meaning. This outcome-wide analysis investigated bidirectional associations between changes in ratings of doing worthwhile things in life and 32 factors in 6 domains of human function in 5,694 men and women (M = 66.65 years) from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Participants rated the extent they felt that the things they did in life were wo...
1 CitationsSource
#1Hei Wan Mak (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 1
#2Daisy Fancourt (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 8
Abstract Rationale Reading for pleasure has been shown to have benefits for academic attainment and the development of empathy. Yet, whether reading for pleasure is linked with other aspects of children's development remains unclear. Objective. This study examines the association between reading for pleasure and children's psychological and behavioural adjustment at the onset of adolescence. Method. We analysed data from 8936 participants in the Millennium Cohort Study, Sweeps 4 (age 7) and 5 (a...
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#1Daisy Fancourt (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 8
#2Hei Wan Mak (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 1
OBJECTIVES: Participation in the arts has well-documented benefits for health. However, participation in the arts is socially patterned, and it remains unclear why this is: what factors act as barriers or enablers of individual arts engagement. Therefore this study explored how individual characteristics predict individuals' capabilities, opportunities and motivations to engage in participatory arts activities. METHODS: We analysed data from 6,867 adults in the UK (61.2% female, average age 46.7...
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#1Daisy Fancourt (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 8
#2Louise Baxter (UCL: University College London)
Last. Fabiana Lorencatto (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 11
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BACKGROUND: There is a large literature on the health benefits of engagement with the arts. However, there are also well-recognised challenges in ensuring equity of engagement with these activities. Specifically, it remains unclear whether individuals with poor mental health experience more barriers to participation. This study used a behaviour change framework to explore barriers to engagement in participatory arts activities amongst people with either depression or anxiety. METHODS: Data were ...
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#1Keir Elmslie James Philip (NIH: National Institutes of Health)
#1Keir Philip (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 1
Last. Daisy Fancourt (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 8
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Iron is central to multiple biological pathways, and treatment of non-anaemic absolute iron deficiency (NAID) is beneficial in certain conditions. However, it is unknown if NAID is associated with increased mortality in older adults. A nationally representative sample of 4451 older adults from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing was used. NAID was defined as serum ferritin /= 120 g/l (women) or >/= 130 g/l (men). Cumulative mortality was estimated by Kaplan-Meier method. Unadjusted and adju...
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#2Hei Wan Mak (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 1
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Background: Arts engagement within communities is ubiquitous across cultures globally and previous research has suggested its benefits for mental health and wellbeing. However, it remains unclear whether these benefits are driven by arts engagement itself or by important confounders such as socio-economic status (SES), childhood arts engagement, previous mental health, personality, or self-selection bias. The aim of this study is to use fixed effects models that account for unidentified time-con...
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#1Daisy Fancourt (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 8
#2Andrew Steptoe (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 112
Abstract Objectives There is a large literature linking inflammation with mental ill health, but a much smaller literature focusing on mental wellbeing. Specifically, it remains unclear whether mental wellbeing is longitudinally independently associated with inflammation or only via associated changes in mental ill health. Methods This study used data from 8,780 adults aged 50+ in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Hedonic wellbeing (both positive affect and life satisfaction) and eudemon...
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