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Eric E. Nelson
National Institutes of Health
97Publications
43H-index
7,639Citations
Publications 97
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Biological Psychology 2.63
Tomer Shechner17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of Haifa),
Johanna M. Jarcho20
Estimated H-index: 20
(NIH: National Institutes of Health)
+ 3 AuthorsEric E. Nelson43
Estimated H-index: 43
(NIH: National Institutes of Health)
Abstract The current study examines anxiety and age associations with attention allocation and physiological response to threats and rewards. Twenty-two healthy-adults, 20 anxious-adults, 26 healthy-youth, and 19 anxious-youth completed two eye-tracking tasks. In the Visual Scene Task (VST), participants’ fixations were recorded while they viewed a central neutral image flanked by two threatening or two rewarding stimuli. In the Negative Words Task (NWT), physiological response was measured by m...
Published on Nov 1, 2016in Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews 8.00
Amanda E. Guyer32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Jennifer S. Silk38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Pittsburgh),
Eric E. Nelson43
Estimated H-index: 43
Abstract Adolescents are commonly portrayed as highly emotional, with their behaviors often hijacked by their emotions. Research on the neural substrates of adolescent affective behavior is beginning to paint a more nuanced picture of how neurodevelopmental changes in brain function influence affective behavior, and how these influences are modulated by external factors in the environment. Recent neurodevelopmental models suggest that the brain is designed to promote emotion regulation, learning...
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Child Psychiatry & Human Development 2.07
Lindsey B. Stone8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Pittsburgh),
Jennifer S. Silk38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 5 AuthorsNeil P. Jones9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Pittsburgh)
Heightened emotional reactivity to peer feedback is predictive of adolescents’ depression risk. Examining variation in emotional reactivity within currently depressed adolescents may identify subgroups that struggle the most with these daily interactions. We tested whether trait rumination, which amplifies emotional reactions, explained variance in depressed adolescents’ physiological reactivity to peer feedback, hypothesizing that rumination would be associated with greater pupillary response t...
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience 4.92
Eric E. Nelson43
Estimated H-index: 43
,
Johanna M. Jarcho20
Estimated H-index: 20
,
Amanda E. Guyer32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
Social development has been the focus of a great deal of neuroscience based research over the past decade. In this review, we focus on providing a framework for understanding how changes in facets of social development may correspond with changes in brain function. We argue that (1) distinct phases of social behavior emerge based on whether the organizing social force is the mother, peer play, peer integration, or romantic intimacy; (2) each phase is marked by a high degree of affect-driven moti...
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Psychological Medicine 5.64
Anna Vannucci14
Estimated H-index: 14
(USU: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences),
Eric E. Nelson43
Estimated H-index: 43
(NIH: National Institutes of Health)
+ 3 AuthorsMarian Tanofsky-Kraff36
Estimated H-index: 36
(USU: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences)
Background Pediatric loss-of-control eating is a robust behavioral precursor to binge-type eating disorders. Elucidating precursors to loss-of-control eating and binge-type eating disorders may refine developmental risk models of eating disorders and inform interventions.
Published on Aug 1, 2015in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 3.66
Jeffrey M. Spielberg23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of California, Berkeley),
Johanna M. Jarcho20
Estimated H-index: 20
+ 3 AuthorsEric E. Nelson43
Estimated H-index: 43
Adolescence is the time of peak onset for many anxiety disorders, particularly Social Anxiety Disorder. Research using simulated social interactions consistently finds differential activation in several brain regions in anxious (vs non-anxious) youth, including amygdala, striatum and medial prefrontal cortex. However, few studies examined the anticipation of peer interactions, a key component in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders. Youth completed the Chatroom Task while undergoing...
Published on Jul 1, 2015in Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 3.41
Amanda E. Guyer32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Johanna M. Jarcho20
Estimated H-index: 20
(NIH: National Institutes of Health)
+ 4 AuthorsEric E. Nelson43
Estimated H-index: 43
(NIH: National Institutes of Health)
Behavioral inhibition (BI) is a temperament characterized by social reticence and withdrawal from unfamiliar or novel contexts and conveys risk for social anxiety disorder. Developmental outcomes associated with this temperament can be influenced by children’s caregiving context. The convergence of a child’s temperamental disposition and rearing environment is ultimately expressed at both the behavioral and neural levels in emotional and cognitive response patterns to social challenges. The pres...
Published on Jun 1, 2015in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience 4.92
Johanna M. Jarcho20
Estimated H-index: 20
,
Adrienne L. Romer5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Duke University)
+ 5 AuthorsEric E. Nelson43
Estimated H-index: 43
a b s t r a c t Social anxiety disorder typically begins in adolescence, a sensitive period for brain development, when increased complexity and salience of peer relationships requires novel forms of social learning. Dis- ordered social learning in adolescence may explain how brain dysfunction promotes social anxiety. Socially anxious adolescents (n = 15) and adults (n = 19) and non-anxious adolescents (n = 24) and adults (n = 32) predicted, then received, social feedback from high and low-value...
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