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Brent F. Kim
Johns Hopkins University
10Publications
6H-index
158Citations
Publications 10
Newest
#1Brent F. KimH-Index: 6
#2Raychel SantoH-Index: 4
Last.Keeve E. NachmanH-Index: 21
view all 12 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Brent F. Kim (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 6
#2Raychel Santo (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 4
Last.Keeve E. NachmanH-Index: 21
view all 12 authors...
Abstract Undernutrition, obesity, climate change, and freshwater depletion share food and agricultural systems as an underlying driver. Efforts to more closely align dietary patterns with sustainability and health goals could be better informed with data covering the spectrum of countries characterized by over- and undernutrition. Here, we model the greenhouse gas (GHG) and water footprints of nine increasingly plant-forward diets, aligned with criteria for a healthy diet, specific to 140 countr...
1 CitationsSource
#1Rebecca Ramsing (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 1
#2Brent F. Kim (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 6
Last.Roni A. Neff (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 17
view all 3 authors...
Source
#1Colleen M. Synk (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 1
#2Brent F. Kim (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 6
Last.Keeve E. NachmanH-Index: 21
view all 8 authors...
Abstract As a component of urban food systems, foraging—the collection of plant or fungal materials, such as berries and nuts, not deliberately cultivated for human use—may promote positive cultural, ecological, economic, and health outcomes. Foraging behaviors, motivations, and barriers in the urban context remain under-characterized despite emerging literature on the subject. We surveyed 105 self-identified foragers in Baltimore, Maryland about species, quantity, seasonality, and preparation o...
11 CitationsSource
#1Brent F. Kim (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 6
#2Keeve E. Nachman (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 21
Last.Raychel Santo (Cardiff University)H-Index: 4
view all 5 authors...
4 CitationsSource
#1Joan A. Casey (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation)H-Index: 11
#2Brent F. Kim (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 6
Last.Keeve E. Nachman (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 21
view all 5 authors...
Industrial food animal production (IFAP) is a source of environmental microbial and chemical hazards. A growing body of literature suggests that populations living near these operations and manure-applied crop fields are at elevated risk for several health outcomes. We reviewed the literature published since 2000 and identified four health outcomes consistently and positively associated with living near IFAP: respiratory outcomes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Q fever, and ...
22 CitationsSource
#1Kerry L. Shannon (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 4
#2Brent F. Kim (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 6
Last.Robert S. Lawrence (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 25
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The US food system functions within a complex nexus of social, political, economic, cultural, and ecological factors. Among them are many dynamic pressures such as population growth, urbanization, socioeconomic inequities, climate disruption, and the increasing demand for resourceintensive foods that place immense strains on public health and the environment. This review focuses on the role that policy plays in defining the food system, particularly with regard to agriculture. It further examine...
10 CitationsSource
#1Brent F. KimH-Index: 6
#2Roni A. NeffH-Index: 17
Last.Juliana VigoritoH-Index: 1
view all 4 authors...
11 Citations
#1Brent F. Kim (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 6
#2Melissa N. Poulsen (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 6
Last.Keeve E. Nachman (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 21
view all 6 authors...
Although urban community gardening can offer health, social, environmental, and economic benefits, these benefits must be weighed against the potential health risks stemming from exposure to contaminants such as heavy metals and organic chemicals that may be present in urban soils. Individuals who garden at or eat food grown in contaminated urban garden sites may be at risk of exposure to such contaminants. Gardeners may be unaware of these risks and how to manage them. We used a mixed quantitat...
30 CitationsSource
#1Brent F. Kim (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 6
#2Roni A. Neff (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 17
Food consumption may account for upwards of 15% of U.S. per capita greenhouse gas emissions. Online carbon calculators can help consumers prioritize among dietary behaviors to minimize personal "carbon footprints," leveraging against emissions-intensive industry practices. We reviewed the fitness of selected carbon calculators for measuring and communicating indirect GHG emissions from food consumption. Calculators were evaluated based on the scope of user behaviors accounted for, data sources, ...
68 CitationsSource
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