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Gabriele Sansalone
University of New England (Australia)
PaleontologyTalpidaeMorphometricsBiologyZoology
37Publications
6H-index
142Citations
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Publications 38
Newest
#1Marina MelchionnaH-Index: 4
#2Alessandro Mondanaro (UniFI: University of Florence)H-Index: 4
Last. Pasquale RaiaH-Index: 26
view all 11 authors...
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#1Ada J. Klinkhamer (UNE: University of New England (Australia))H-Index: 3
#2Nicholas Woodley (University of Newcastle)
Last. Stephen Wroe (UNE: University of New England (Australia))H-Index: 37
view all 9 authors...
The largest antlers of any known deer species belonged to the extinct giant deer Megaloceros giganteus. It has been argued that their antlers were too large for use in fighting, instead being used ...
Source
#1Han Hu (UNE: University of New England (United States))H-Index: 1
#2Gabriele Sansalone (UNE: University of New England (United States))H-Index: 6
Last. ZHOUZhonghe (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 47
view all 8 authors...
Most living birds exhibit cranial kinesis—movement between the rostrum and braincase—in which force is transferred through the palatal and jugal bars. The palate alone distinguishes the Paleognathae from the Neognathae, with cranial kinesis more developed in neognaths. Most previous palatal studies were based on 2D data and rarely incorporated data from stem birds despite great interest in their kinetic abilities. Here we reconstruct the vomer of the Early Cretaceous stem bird Sapeornis and the ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Gabriele Sansalone (UNE: University of New England (Australia))H-Index: 6
#2Paolo Colangelo (National Research Council)H-Index: 16
Last. Paolo PirasH-Index: 21
view all 6 authors...
Background Understanding the mechanisms promoting or constraining morphological diversification within clades is a central topic in evolutionary biology. Ecological transitions are of particular interest because of their influence upon the selective forces and factors involved in phenotypic evolution. Here we focused on the humerus and mandibles of talpid moles to test whether the transition to the subterranean lifestyle impacted morphological disparity and phenotypic traits covariation between ...
Source
#1Dimitri Neaux (University of Poitiers)H-Index: 5
#2Stephen Wroe (UNE: University of New England (Australia))H-Index: 37
Last. Gabriele Sansalone (UNE: University of New England (Australia))H-Index: 6
view all 5 authors...
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#1Leah R. Tsang (UNE: University of New England (Australia))H-Index: 2
#2Laura A. B. Wilson (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 15
Last. Gabriele Sansalone (UNE: University of New England (Australia))H-Index: 6
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Most birds of prey (raptors), rely heavily on their talons for capturing prey. However, the relationship between talon shape and the ability to take prey is poorly understood. In this study we investigate whether raptor talons have evolved primarily in response to adaptive pressures exerted by different dietary demands, or if talon morphology is largely constrained by allometric or phylogenetic factors. We focus on the hallux talon and include 21 species in total varying greatly in body mass and...
2 CitationsSource
#1Achim H. Schwermann (University of Bonn)H-Index: 4
#2Kai He (KIZ: Kunming Institute of Zoology)H-Index: 1
Last. Gabriele Sansalone (UNE: University of New England (Australia))H-Index: 6
view all 5 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Gabriele SansaloneH-Index: 6
Source
#1D. Rex Mitchell (UNE: University of New England (Australia))H-Index: 2
#2Emma Sherratt (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 14
Last. Stephen Wroe (UNE: University of New England (Australia))H-Index: 37
view all 6 authors...
Interspecific variation in the craniofacial morphology of kangaroos and wallabies is associated with diet and feeding behaviors. Yet, to how fine a taxonomic scale this relationship might exist is unknown. Using a combination of established morphometric analyses and novel finite element approaches, we test the limits of these associations by examining three closely-related pademelon taxa: the red-necked pademelon (Thylogale thetis), and two subspecies of the red-legged pademelon (Thylogale stigm...
1 CitationsSource
#1Stephen WroeH-Index: 37
#2Gabriele SansaloneH-Index: 6
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