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Bronwyn W. Williams
North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
18Publications
3H-index
22Citations
Publications 18
Newest
#1Günter Vogt (Heidelberg University)H-Index: 20
#2Nathan J. Dorn (FAU: Florida Atlantic University)H-Index: 8
Last.Anne Schrimpf (University of Koblenz and Landau)H-Index: 12
view all 7 authors...
Abstract The biological changes caused by autotriploidy are poorly studied in animals. To investigate this issue in depth, we compared genetics, morphology, life history, ecology and behaviour of the triploid marbled crayfish and its diploid parent, slough crayfish Procambarus fallax . We performed a meta-analysis of our data and literature data. Our COI based molecular tree, consisting of 27 species of Cambaridae, confirmed the close taxonomic relationship between marbled crayfish and P . falla...
#1Anna J. Phillips (National Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 9
#2Alex Dornburg (North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences)
Last.Bronwyn W. Williams (North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences)H-Index: 3
view all 9 authors...
#1Anna J. Phillips (National Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 9
#2Alex Dornburg (North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences)
Last.Bronwyn W. Williams (North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences)H-Index: 3
view all 9 authors...
#1Kevin M. Horn (SIU: Southern Illinois University Carbondale)H-Index: 2
#2Bronwyn W. Williams (Kentucky Wesleyan College)
Last.Frank E. Anderson (SIU: Southern Illinois University Carbondale)H-Index: 13
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#1Michael Perkins (North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission)
#2Bronwyn W. Williams (North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences)H-Index: 3
Last.William T. Russ (North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission)H-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
A new species of stream-dwelling crayfish, Cambarus franklini, the South Mountains crayfish, is described from the upper South Fork Catawba River basin in western North Carolina, USA using morphological and genetic data. Cambarus franklini was previously considered a member of the widespread and morphologically variable Cambarus species C complex and is morphologically most similar to an undiagnosed member of the group native to the upper Catawba River basin in NC. Cambarus franklini can be diff...
#1Bronwyn W. Williams (North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences)H-Index: 3
#2Patricia G. Weaver (North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences)H-Index: 4
Entocythere cambaria was described by William S. Marshall in 1903 as the first species in what would later become family Entocytheridae. Designated as the type species of Entocythere both by original designation and monotypy, E . cambaria is integral to understanding relationships within the genus. Yet, a type series for E. cambaria was not designated, and specimens used by Marshall to describe the species have since been deemed no longer extant. C.W. Hart Jr. and Dabney Hart assigned a neotype ...
#1Laura Lukas (North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences)
#2Patricia G. Weaver (North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences)H-Index: 4
Last.Bronwyn W. Williams (North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences)H-Index: 3
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North American crayfishes are hosts for 2 major groups of obligate ectosymbionts, namely annelids of the order Branchiobdellida and ostracods of the family Entocytheridae. These symbionts are widely distributed across the continent, coincident with their typical hosts; however, the diversity and distribution of both groups are poorly known in much of the northeastern US. We examined 93 crayfishes collected from 30 sites across New England for the presence of branchiobdellidans and entocytherids....
#1Bronwyn W. Williams (North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences)H-Index: 3
#2Emmy Michaela Delekta (West Liberty University)
Last.Zachary J. Loughman (West Liberty University)H-Index: 8
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Cambarus acuminatus was described by Walter Faxon in 1884 from three specimens collected from the Saluda River in northwestern South Carolina, USA. Cambarus acuminatus sensu lato has since been acknowledged to comprise a species complex. This complex, also known as Cambarus sp. C, spans a range across much of the Piedmont Plateau and Coastal Plain from central South Carolina north to Maryland and southeastern Pennsylvania. A primary impediment to a much-needed thorough taxonomic assessment and r...
#1Bronwyn W. Williams (North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences)H-Index: 3
#2Patricia G. Weaver (North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences)H-Index: 4
Xironogiton, a genus of crayfish worm (order Branchiobdellida), is historically endemic to North America. To date, six species of Xironogiton have been described, including five and one from areas west and east of the Continental Divide, respectively. Recent collections of the crayfishes Pacifastacus connectens and Pacifastacus leniusculus from the endorheic Harney Basin in south-eastern Oregon, USA, revealed the presence of two previously unknown Xironogiton species, which we describe herein. D...
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