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Erik G. Helzer
Johns Hopkins University
29Publications
10H-index
315Citations
Publications 30
Newest
Abstract People evaluate the moral character of others not only based on what they do, but also on what leads them to do it. Because an agent's state of mind is not directly observable, people typically engage in mindreading—attempts at inferring mental states—when forming moral evaluations. The present paper identifies a general target of such mental state inference, mental occurrents—a catchall term for the thoughts, beliefs, principles, feelings, concerns, and rules accessible in an agent's m...
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#1Chelsea Helion (Columbia University)H-Index: 8
#2Erik G. Helzer (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 10
Last.David A. Pizarro (Cornell University)H-Index: 34
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#1Erik G. Helzer (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 10
#2Sharon H. Kim (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 5
Organizational research on creativity tends to focus on creative outcomes such as novel and useful ideas or solutions to challenging problems. The current work considers another function of workpla...
1 CitationsSource
#1Korrina A. Duffy (Duke University)H-Index: 3
#2Erik G. Helzer (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 10
Last.Tanya L. Chartrand (Duke University)H-Index: 34
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Given research suggesting that social interactions are beneficial, it is unclear why individuals lower in extraversion engage less in social interactions. In this study, we test whether individuals lower in extraversion reap fewer hedonic rewards from social interactions and explore social psychological processes that explain their experiences. Before participants socialized, we measured extraversion, state positive affect, cognitive capacity, and expectations about the social interactions. Afte...
1 CitationsSource
#1Erik G. HelzerH-Index: 10
#2Sharon H. KimH-Index: 5
Last.Angela K.-Y. LeungH-Index: 18
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The goal of the proposed symposium is to broaden this perspective to consider a wider variety of ways that creativity may be good for organizations and its members. In particular, the six papers in this symposium consider whether creative thinking can directly promote health and well-being within the workers who engage it. In other words, this symposium asks if creativity might be “good for youx in the sense that it improves the psychological functioning and well- being of managers and employees...
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#1Erik G. Helzer (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 10
#2Emily Rosenzweig (Tulane University)H-Index: 3
Despite its centrality to public discourse and everyday ethical judgment and behavior, a robust conceptual understanding of greed has been lacking from the management literature (Wang & Murninghan, 2011). This paper focuses on the factors that shape ordinary perceptions of greedy actions and business practices. Supplementing existing accounts that conceptualize greed as a sin of acquisitiveness or insatiability (always wanting more), we find in five studies that real or potential harm to other p...
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#1Erik G. Helzer (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 10
#2William Fleeson (Wake Forest University)H-Index: 28
Last.Maxwell Barranti (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 3
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Although individual differences in the application of moral principles, such as utilitarianism, have been documented, so too have powerful context effects-effects that raise doubts about the durability of people's moral principles. In this article, we examine the robustness of individual differences in moral judgment by examining them across time and across different decision contexts. In Study 1, consistency in utilitarian judgment of 122 adult participants was examined over two different surve...
1 CitationsSource
#1Brian C. Gunia (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 11
#2Erik G. Helzer (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 10
Decades of negotiation research suggest that deal-making negotiators and disputants achieve the best outcomes when they focus extensively on interests. However, research on whether and how they can actually do that is much more voluminous for deal-making negotiations than disputes. Integrating research on disputes and empathy gaps, we examine that possibility that disputants (naturally in a “hot state”) may have a distinctly hard time implementing their “cold state” intentions to focus on intere...
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#1Anselma G. Hartley (Wake Forest University)H-Index: 2
#2R. Michael Furr (Wake Forest University)H-Index: 26
Last.William Fleeson (Wake Forest University)H-Index: 28
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We examine morality’s relationship to three distinct dimensions of social perception: liking, respecting, and knowing a person. Participants completed two independent tasks. First, they rated acquaintances’ morality, competence, and sociability, and how much they liked, respected, and knew those acquaintances. In the second task, they rated a variety of moral and competence traits on their importance to liking, respecting, and knowing a person. Several findings emerged. First, morality was the m...
9 CitationsSource
#1Emily Stagnaro (Wake Forest University)H-Index: 1
#2Laura E. R. Blackie (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 8
Last.Eranda Jayawickreme (Wake Forest University)H-Index: 15
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In recent years, increased attention has been paid to the possibility of healthy functioning despite the experience of pronounced adversity, either in terms of the absence of psychopathology (resilience; Bonnano, 2004; Infurna and Luthar, 2015) or the development of psychological benefits (self-perceptions of post-traumatic growth; Jayawickreme and Blackie, 2014). The present chapter focuses on the possibilities for healthy functioning in the context of ethnopolitical warfare (Jayawickreme et al...
1 CitationsSource
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