Branding/Logomark minus Citation Combined Shape Icon/Bookmark-empty Icon/Copy Icon/Collection Icon/Close Copy 7 no author result Created with Sketch. Icon/Back Created with Sketch. Match!
Erik G. Helzer
Johns Hopkins University
27Publications
9H-index
272Citations
Publications 27
Newest
Published on Dec 21, 2018in Academy of Management Perspectives 3.86
Sharon H. Kim5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Johns Hopkins University),
Erik G. Helzer9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Johns Hopkins University)
Organizational research on creativity tends to focus on creative outcomes such as novel and useful ideas or solutions to challenging problems. The current work considers another function of workpla...
Published on Aug 1, 2017
Erik G. Helzer9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Sharon H. Kim5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 4 AuthorsAngela K.-Y. Leung18
Estimated H-index: 18
The goal of the proposed symposium is to broaden this perspective to consider a wider variety of ways that creativity may be good for organizations and its members. In particular, the six papers in this symposium consider whether creative thinking can directly promote health and well-being within the workers who engage it. In other words, this symposium asks if creativity might be “good for youx in the sense that it improves the psychological functioning and well- being of managers and employees...
Published on Aug 1, 2017
Erik G. Helzer9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Johns Hopkins University),
Emily Rosenzweig3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Tulane University)
Despite its centrality to public discourse and everyday ethical judgment and behavior, a robust conceptual understanding of greed has been lacking from the management literature (Wang & Murninghan,...
Published on Aug 1, 2017in Journal of Personality 3.08
Erik G. Helzer9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Johns Hopkins University),
William Fleeson27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Wake Forest University)
+ 2 AuthorsMaxwell Barranti3
Estimated H-index: 3
(U of T: University of Toronto)
Although individual differences in the application of moral principles, such as utilitarianism, have been documented, so too have powerful context effects-effects that raise doubts about the durability of people's moral principles. In this article, we examine the robustness of individual differences in moral judgment by examining them across time and across different decision contexts. In Study 1, consistency in utilitarian judgment of 122 adult participants was examined over two different surve...
Published on Apr 1, 2017
Brian C. Gunia11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Johns Hopkins University),
Erik G. Helzer9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Johns Hopkins University)
Decades of negotiation research suggest that deal-making negotiators and disputants achieve the best outcomes when they focus extensively on interests. However, research on whether and how they can actually do that is much more voluminous for deal-making negotiations than disputes. Integrating research on disputes and empathy gaps, we examine that possibility that disputants (naturally in a “hot state”) may have a distinctly hard time implementing their “cold state” intentions to focus on intere...
Published on Sep 1, 2016in Social Psychological and Personality Science 3.60
Anselma G. Hartley2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Wake Forest University),
R. Michael Furr25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Wake Forest University)
+ 3 AuthorsWilliam Fleeson27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Wake Forest University)
We examine morality’s relationship to three distinct dimensions of social perception: liking, respecting, and knowing a person. Participants completed two independent tasks. First, they rated acquaintances’ morality, competence, and sociability, and how much they liked, respected, and knew those acquaintances. In the second task, they rated a variety of moral and competence traits on their importance to liking, respecting, and knowing a person. Several findings emerged. First, morality was the m...
Published on Jan 1, 2016
Emily Stagnaro1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Wake Forest University),
Laura E. R. Blackie8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Nottingham)
+ 1 AuthorsEranda Jayawickreme14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Wake Forest University)
In recent years, increased attention has been paid to the possibility of healthy functioning despite the experience of pronounced adversity, either in terms of the absence of psychopathology (resilience; Bonnano, 2004; Infurna and Luthar, 2015) or the development of psychological benefits (self-perceptions of post-traumatic growth; Jayawickreme and Blackie, 2014). The present chapter focuses on the possibilities for healthy functioning in the context of ethnopolitical warfare (Jayawickreme et al...
Published on Nov 1, 2015
William Fleeson27
Estimated H-index: 27
,
R. Michael Furr25
Estimated H-index: 25
+ 3 AuthorsPeter Meindl7
Estimated H-index: 7
Published on Sep 1, 2015in Social Psychological and Personality Science 3.60
Laura E. R. Blackie8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Wake Forest University),
Eranda Jayawickreme14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Wake Forest University)
+ 2 AuthorsAnn Marie Roepke7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)
Research into posttraumatic growth—positive psychological change that people report in their relationships, priorities in life, and self-perception after experiences of adversity—has been severely critiqued. We investigated the degree to which community members’ friends and relatives corroborated targets’ self-perceived positive and negative changes as measured by the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory-42. We found corroboration only for negative changes when we examined overall (averaged) scores. H...
Published on Aug 1, 2015in Social Psychological and Personality Science 3.60
Erik G. Helzer9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Johns Hopkins University),
Eranda Jayawickreme14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Wake Forest University)
How does a sense of control relate to well-being? We consider two distinguishable control strategies, primary and secondarycontrol, and their relationships with two facets of subjective well-being, daily positive/negative affective experience and global life satisfaction. Using undergraduate and online samples, the results suggest that these different control strategies are associated uniquely with distinct facets of well-being. After controlling for shared variance among constructs, primary con...
123