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Stephen L. Brusatte
University of Edinburgh
164Publications
34H-index
3,578Citations
Publications 164
Newest
#1Waisum Ma (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)
#2Stephen L. Brusatte (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 34
Last.Manabu Sakamoto (University of Reading)H-Index: 10
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#1Sterling J. Nesbitt (VT: Virginia Tech)H-Index: 30
#2Robert K. DentonH-Index: 1
Last.Douglas G. WolfeH-Index: 2
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Late Cretaceous dinosaur assemblages of North America—characterized by gigantic tyrannosaurid predators, and large-bodied herbivorous ceratopsids and hadrosaurids—were highly successful from around 80 million years ago (Ma) until the end of the ‘Age of Dinosaurs’ 66 Ma. However, the origin of these iconic faunas remains poorly understood because of a large, global sampling gap in the mid-Cretaceous, associated with an extreme sea-level rise. We describe the most complete skeleton of a predatory ...
#1Chloe M. E. Young (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)
#2Christophe Hendrickx (University of the Witwatersrand)H-Index: 7
Last.Stephen L. Brusatte (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 34
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The Middle Jurassic is a largely mysterious interval in dinosaur evolution, as few fossils of this age are known worldwide. In recent years, the Isle of Skye has yielded a substantial record of trackways, and a more limited inventory of body fossils, that indicate a diverse fauna of Middle Jurassic dinosaurs living in and around lagoons and deltas. Comparatively little is known about the predators in these faunas (particularly theropod dinosaurs), as their fossils are among the rarest discoverie...
#1Davide Foffa (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 9
#2Michela M. Johnson (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 2
Last.Stephen L. Brusatte (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 34
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Teleosauroids were a successful group of semi-aquatic crocodylomorphs that were an integral part of coastal marine/lagoonal faunas during the Jurassic. Their fossil record suggests that the group declined in diversity and abundance in deep water deposits during the Late Jurassic. One of the few known teleosauroid species from the deeper water horizons of the well-known Kimmeridge Clay Formation is ‘Teleosaurus’ megarhinus Hulke, 1871, a poorly studied, gracile longirostrine form. The holotype is...
#1Davide Foffa (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 9
#2Mark T. Young (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 16
Last.Lorna Steel (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 10
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Metriorhynchids are an extinct group of Jurassic–Cretaceous crocodylomorphs secondarily adapted to a marine lifestyle. A new metriorhynchid crocodylomorph from the Oxford Clay Formation (Callovian, Middle Jurassic) of England is described. The specimen is a large, fragmentary skull and associated single ramus of a lower jaw uniquely preserved in a septarian concretion. The description of the specimen reveals a series of autapomorphies (apicobasal flutings on the middle labial surface of the toot...
#1Davide Foffa (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 9
#2Mark T. Young (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 16
Last.Stephen L. Brusatte (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 34
view all 5 authors...
Marine reptiles flourished in the Mesozoic oceans, filling ecological roles today dominated by crocodylians, large fish, sharks and cetaceans. Many groups of these reptiles coexisted for over 50 million years (Myr), through major environmental changes. However, little is known about how the structure of their ecosystems or their ecologies changed over millions of years. We use the most common marine reptile fossils—teeth—to establish a quantitative system that assigns species to dietary guilds a...
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