Match!
Rosella Motzo
University of Sassari
CultivarTriticaleBotanyAgronomyBiology
50Publications
20H-index
1,023Citations
What is this?
Publications 50
Newest
#1Francesco Giunta (University of Sassari)H-Index: 21
#2Simona BassuH-Index: 9
Last. Rosella Motzo (University of Sassari)H-Index: 20
view all 4 authors...
The growing interest in old durum wheat cultivars, due to enhanced consumer attention on healthy, traditional products and low-input agricultural systems, partly relies on their different quality characteristics compared to modern cultivars. Nine Italian durum wheat cultivars from different breeding periods were compared in two late-sown (January) field trials in order to subject their grain filling period to high temperatures similar to those expected in the future. Late sowing moved anthesis f...
Source
#1Francesco Giunta (University of Sassari)H-Index: 21
#2Francesco Cadeddu (University of Sassari)H-Index: 1
Last. Rosella Motzo (University of Sassari)H-Index: 20
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Cultural systems based on mixtures of varieties may be more successful in resource use and resource use efficiency than those based on single varieties. Two triticale cultivars of different phenology (Bienvenu, intermediate; and Oceania, spring) grown in pure stands were compared with mixtures of the two (25:75; 50:50 and 75:25). Field experiments were carried out in Sardinia (Italy) in five experiments created by combining seasons, sowing date and sites. At the terminal spikelet of Bie...
Source
BACKGROUND: Old durum wheat varieties are being appreciated again because of their interesting genetic diversity and low fertilizer needs. RESULTS: The agronomic and bread-making performances of 14 old Italian durum wheat varieties grown under two low nitrogen (N) inputs (46 and 86 kg ha-1 ) were determined and the relationships among grain, semolina, dough and bread quality parameters were established. The old varieties yielded similarly to the check modern variety Svevo under both N levels. In...
1 CitationsSource
#1Francesco Giunta (University of Sassari)H-Index: 21
#2Giovanni Pruneddu (University of Sassari)H-Index: 8
Last. Rosella Motzo (University of Sassari)H-Index: 20
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Both durum and bread wheat are well adapted to Mediterranean environments where durum wheat is traditionally assigned to more stressful conditions. Twenty-seven cultivars of each species were grown under 4 environments in Sardinia (Italy) to characterize the differences in grain yield and protein between and within them. The large number of cultivars revealed large within-species variability in yield and no or just minor between-species differences, which indicated bread wheat as better...
1 CitationsSource
Following the boom in durum wheat breeding, ancient wheat disappeared from the human diet and old durum wheat varieties were replaced by what is believed to be their better versions: higher yielding modern varieties grown in high-input systems. Breeders have worked intensely ever since to improve the quality of durum wheat traits ? mainly gluten subunit alleles ? to obtain superior technological quality in the main durum wheat end products (first pasta and then bread) but conflicts about predict...
2 CitationsSource
#1Francesco Giunta (University of Sassari)H-Index: 21
#2Giovanni Pruneddu (University of Sassari)H-Index: 8
Last. Rosella Motzo (University of Sassari)H-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
Abstract A five-year field trial was performed in a typical Mediterranean environment to compare grain yield (GY) and GY stability, grain protein percentage (GP) and GP stability resulting from different cropping systems: two based on 14 old durum wheat landraces/cultivars grown in low-fertility soils; and one based on 14 modern cultivars grown in high-fertility soils. Cropping systems were also differentiated in terms of sowing date, sowing rate (250 vs. 350 viable seeds m−2 for the modern cult...
2 CitationsSource
#1Senthold Asseng (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 47
#2Pierre Martre (University of Montpellier)H-Index: 39
Last. Frank Ewert (University of Bonn)H-Index: 48
view all 67 authors...
Wheat grain protein concentration is an important determinant of wheat quality for human nutrition that is often overlooked in efforts to improve crop production. We tested and applied a 32‐multi‐model ensemble to simulate global wheat yield and quality in a changing climate. Potential benefits of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration by 2050 on global wheat grain and protein yield are likely to be negated by impacts from rising temperature and changes in rainfall, but with considerable dispari...
13 CitationsSource
#1Francesco Giunta (University of Sassari)H-Index: 21
#2Pasquale De Vita (Canadian Real Estate Association)H-Index: 7
Last. Rosella Motzo (University of Sassari)H-Index: 20
view all 5 authors...
Phenology has a profound effect on adaptation and productivity of crops. The impact of phenology on tillering and fertility traits of durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. subsp. durum Desf.) was evaluated with the aim of specifying which group of flowering genes (Vrn, Ppd or eps) was involved in their control. A recombinant inbred line population was grown under four contrasting conditions of vernalisation and daylength. Phenotyping was carried out according to robust phenological models dissecting...
7 CitationsSource
#1Francesco Giunta (University of Sassari)H-Index: 21
#2Giovanni Pruneddu (University of Sassari)H-Index: 8
Last. Rosella Motzo (University of Sassari)H-Index: 20
view all 4 authors...
Abstract The lateness, tallness and high vigour of old tall durum wheat cultivars could be advantageous for dual-purpose use and their high propensity for lodging should be reduced by grazing. A 3-year field trial was performed in Sardinia, Italy, in a typical Mediterranean environment. Crops of the durum wheat cultivar Senatore Cappelli were sown in October, and grazing was simulated by clipping half of the plots at the terminal spikelet stage of development. The forage biomass derived from cli...
2 CitationsSource
#1Francesco Giunta (University of Sassari)H-Index: 21
#2Rosella Motzo (University of Sassari)H-Index: 20
Last. Agnese Cabigliera (University of Sassari)H-Index: 2
view all 4 authors...
Abstract The dual-purpose use of cereals can be a convenient management option if grain yield (GY) is not significantly reduced. The effects of clipping at the terminal spikelet stage on biomass and grain production of an intermediate (‘Bienvenu’) and a spring (‘Oceania’) triticale cultivar grown at two sowing rates (300 and 600 seeds per m 2 ) were analysed in terms of the changes induced on radiation and water capture and use and biomass partitioning in five different Mediterranean environment...
2 CitationsSource
12345