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Leonardo G. Cohen
National Institutes of Health
PsychologyNeuroscienceStimulationMotor cortexTranscranial magnetic stimulation
449Publications
116H-index
47.7kCitations
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Publications 465
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#1Marlene BönstrupH-Index: 10
Last. Leonardo G. CohenH-Index: 116
view all 5 authors...
Performance improvements during early human motor skill learning are suggested to be driven by short periods of rest during practice, at the scale of seconds. To reveal the unknown mechanisms behind these “micro-offline” gains, we leveraged the sampling power offered by online crowdsourcing (cumulative N over all experiments = 951). First, we replicated the original in-lab findings, demonstrating generalizability to subjects learning the task in their daily living environment (N = 389). Second, ...
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#2Andre G. MachadoH-Index: 27
Last. Leonardo G. CohenH-Index: 116
view all 9 authors...
Background: Repetitive peripheral nerve sensory stimulation (RPSS) has emerged as a potential adjuvant strategy to motor training in stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that 3-hour sessions of active RPSS associated with functional electrical stimulation (FES) and task-specific training (TST) distributed three times a week, over six weeks, is more beneficial to improve upper limb motor function than sham RPSS in addition to FES and TST, in subjects with moderat...
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#1Marco Sandrini (USU: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences)H-Index: 21
#2Benjamin Xu (USU: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences)H-Index: 9
Last. Leonardo G. Cohen (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 116
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Background Response inhibition refers to the ability to stop an on-going action quickly when it is no longer appropriate. Previous studies showed that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied with the anode over the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC), a critical node of the fronto-basal ganglia inhibitory network, improved response inhibition. However, the tDCS effects on brain activity and network connectivity underlying this behavioral improvement are not known. Object...
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#1Sara J. Hussain (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 1
#2Leonardo G. Cohen (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 116
Last. Marlene Bönstrup (Leipzig University)H-Index: 10
view all 3 authors...
The beta rhythm (15–30 Hz) is a prominent signal of sensorimotor cortical activity. This rhythm is not sustained but occurs non-rhythmically as brief events of a few (1–2) oscillatory cycles. Recent work on the relationship between these events and sensorimotor performance suggests that they are the biologically relevant elements of the beta rhythm. However, the influence of these events on corticospinal excitability, a mechanism through which the primary motor cortex controls motor output, is u...
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#1Marlene Bönstrup (UHH: University of Hamburg)H-Index: 10
#2Lutz A. Krawinkel (UHH: University of Hamburg)H-Index: 2
Last. Christian Gerloff (UHH: University of Hamburg)H-Index: 65
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OBJECTIVE: The majority of patients with stroke survive the acute episode and live with enduring disability. Effective therapies to support recovery of motor function after stroke are yet to be developed. Key to this development is the identification of neurophysiologic signals that mark recovery and are suitable and susceptible to interventional therapies. Movement preparatory low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) play a key role in cortical control of movement. Recent animal data point to a mechan...
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#1Sara J. Hussain (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 1
#2Mary K Vollmer (NIH: National Institutes of Health)
Last. Leonardo G. Cohen (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 116
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Successful initiation of a voluntary movement requires transmission of descending motor commands from the primary motor cortex (M1) to the spinal cord and effector muscles. M1 activity alternates between brief excitatory and inhibitory brain states in the form of oscillatory phases that correlate with single neuron spiking rates and population-level neuronal activity. The influence of these brief brain states on fundamental motor behaviors, like movement initiation, is not known. Here, we asked ...
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#1Sara J. Hussain (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 1
#2Leonardo Claudino (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 1
Last. Leonardo G. Cohen (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 116
view all 10 authors...
4 CitationsSource
#1Sara J. HussainH-Index: 1
#2Leonardo G. CohenH-Index: 116
Last. Marlene BoenstrupH-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
The beta rhythm (15-30 Hz) is a prominent signal of sensorimotor cortical activity. This rhythm is not sustained but occurs non-rhythmically as brief events of a few (1-2) oscillatory cycles. Recent work on the relationship between these events and sensorimotor performance suggests that they are the biologically relevant elements of the beta rhythm. However, the influence of these events on corticospinal excitability, a mechanism through which the primary motor cortex controls motor output, is u...
Source
#1Romain QuentinH-Index: 8
#2Jean-Rémi King (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 17
Last. Leonardo G. CohenH-Index: 116
view all 7 authors...
Working memory is our ability to select and temporarily hold information as needed for complex cognitive operations. The temporal dynamics of sustained and transient neural activity supporting the selection and holding of memory content is not known. To address this problem, we recorded magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy participants performing a retro-cue working memory task in which the selection rule and the memory content varied independently. Multivariate decoding and source analyses s...
11 CitationsSource
#1Oluwole Awosika (UC: University of Cincinnati)H-Index: 6
#2Marco Sandrini (University of Roehampton)H-Index: 21
Last. Leonardo G. CohenH-Index: 116
view all 9 authors...
Abstract Background Ambulation is an essential aspect of daily living and is often impaired after brain and spinal cord injuries. Despite the implementation of standard neurorehabilitative care, locomotor recovery is often incomplete. Objective In this randomized, sham-controlled, double-blind, parallel design study, we aimed to determine if anodal transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (anodal tsDCS) could improve training effects on locomotion compared to sham (sham tsDCS) in healthy...
1 CitationsSource
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