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Roland Schaette
UCL Ear Institute
33Publications
15H-index
1,194Citations
Publications 33
Newest
#1Naomi F. Bramhall (OHSU: Oregon Health & Science University)H-Index: 2
#2Elizabeth Francis Beach (Macquarie University)H-Index: 10
Last.Barbara Canlon (KI: Karolinska Institutet)H-Index: 34
view all 9 authors...
Animal studies demonstrate that noise exposure can permanently damage the synapses between inner hair cells and auditory nerve fibers, even when outer hair cells are intact and there is no clinically relevant permanent threshold shift. Synaptopathy disrupts the afferent connection between the cochlea and the central auditory system and is predicted to impair speech understanding in noisy environments and potentially result in tinnitus and/or hyperacusis. While cochlear synaptopathy has been demo...
6 CitationsSource
#1Hannah Brotherton (RMIT: RMIT University)H-Index: 3
#2Charlotte Turtle (RMIT: RMIT University)H-Index: 2
Last.Roland Schaette (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 15
view all 5 authors...
Abstract The occurrence of tinnitus is associated with hearing loss and neuroplastic changes in the brain, but disentangling correlation and causation has remained difficult in both human and animal studies. Here we use earplugs to cause a period of monaural deprivation to induce a temporary, fully reversible tinnitus sensation, to test whether differences in subcortical changes in neural response gain, as reflected through changes in acoustic reflex thresholds (ARTs), could explain the occurren...
Source
#1Warren Michael Henry Bakay (University of Manchester)H-Index: 3
#2La Anderson (UCL Ear Institute)H-Index: 9
Last.Roland Schaette (UCL Ear Institute)H-Index: 15
view all 5 authors...
Exposure to even a single episode of loud noise can damage synapses between cochlear hair cells and auditory nerve fibres, causing hidden hearing loss (HHL) that is not detected by audiometry. Here we investigate the effects of noise-induced HHL on functional hearing by measuring the ability of neurons in the auditory midbrain of mice to adapt to sound environments containing quiet and loud periods. Neurons from noise-exposed mice show less capacity for adaptation to loud environments, convey le...
5 CitationsSource
#1La Anderson (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 9
#2Lara Li Hesse (University of Lübeck)H-Index: 2
Last.Jennifer F. Linden (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 19
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Abstract Noise exposure has been shown to produce long-lasting increases in spontaneous activity in central auditory structures in animal models, and similar pathologies are thought to contribute to clinical phenomena such as hyperacusis or tinnitus in humans. Here we demonstrate that multi-unit spontaneous neuronal activity in the inferior colliculus (IC) of mice is significantly elevated four weeks following noise exposure at recording sites with frequency tuning within or near the noise expos...
3 CitationsSource
#1Lauren V. Parry (RMIT: RMIT University)
#2Michael R.D. Maslin (RMIT: RMIT University)H-Index: 5
Last.Kevin J. Munro (RMIT: RMIT University)H-Index: 22
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Abstract Animal studies have demonstrated that unilateral hearing loss can induce changes in neural response amplitude of the mature central auditory system (CAS). However, there is limited physiological evidence of these neural gain changes in the auditory cortex of human adults. The present study investigated the impact of chronic, unilateral conductive hearing impairment on cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) recorded from 15 adults (21–65 years old) in response to a 1 kHz tone (80 ms...
Source
#1Hannah Brotherton (MAHSC: Manchester Academic Health Science Centre)H-Index: 3
#2Christopher J. Plack (Lancaster University)H-Index: 36
Last.Kevin J. Munro (Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust)H-Index: 22
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Unilateral auditory deprivation induces a reduction in the acoustic reflex threshold (ART) and an increase in loudness. These findings have been interpreted as a compensatory change in neural gain, governed by changes in excitatory and inhibitory neural inputs. There is also evidence to suggest that changes in neural gain can be measured using the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The present study extended Munro et al. (2014) [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 135, 315–322] by investigating changes...
4 CitationsSource
#1Laurence McKenna (UCLH: University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust)H-Index: 3
#2Elizabeth M. Marks (UCLH: University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust)H-Index: 1
Last.Roland Schaette (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 15
view all 4 authors...
BACKGROUND: Tinnitus is experienced by up to 15% of the population and can lead to significant disability and distress. There is rarely a medical or surgical target and psychological therapies are recommended. We investigated whether mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) could offer an effective new therapy for tinnitus. METHODS: This single-site randomized controlled trial compared MBCT to intensive relaxation training (RT) for chronic, distressing tinnitus in adults. Both treatments invol...
9 CitationsSource
#1Hannah Brotherton (MAHSC: Manchester Academic Health Science Centre)H-Index: 3
#2Christopher J. Plack (Lancaster University)H-Index: 36
Last.Kevin J. Munro (St Mary's Hospital)H-Index: 22
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Auditory deprivation and stimulation can change the threshold of the acoustic reflex, but the mechanisms underlying these changes remain largely unknown. In order to elucidate the mechanism, we sought to characterize the time-course as well as the frequency specificity of changes in acoustic reflex thresholds (ARTs). In addition, we compared ipsilateral and contralateral measurements because the pattern of findings may shed light on the anatomical location of the change in neural gain. ...
7 CitationsSource
Increasing evidence indicates that noise exposure selectively damages high-threshold auditory nerve fibres, in the absence of damage to sensory hair cells. This “hidden hearing loss (HHL)"—undetected by conventional tests such as audiometry—is suggested to account for undiagnosed difficulties processing speech in background noise. Here, we demonstrate in the midbrain of gerbils exposed to a single, controlled noise insult, and in human listeners, evidence of increased neural gain in the central ...
Source
#1Hannah Brotherton (USF: University of South Florida)H-Index: 3
Last.Kevin J. Munro (St Mary's Hospital)H-Index: 22
view all 4 authors...
Unilateral auditory deprivation or stimulation can induce changes in loudness and modify the sound level required to elicit the acoustic reflex. This has been explained in terms of a change in neural response, or gain, for a given sound level. However, it is unclear if these changes are driven by the asymmetry in auditory input or if they will also occur following bilateral changes in auditory input. The present study used a cross-over trial of unilateral and bilateral amplification to investiga...
1 CitationsSource
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