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James S. Marks
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Public healthPregnancyPopulationDiabetes mellitusMedicine
124Publications
48H-index
35.5kCitations
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Publications 120
Newest
#1Vincent J. Felitti (KP: Kaiser Permanente)H-Index: 57
#2Robert F. Anda (CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)H-Index: 69
Last. James S. Marks (CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)H-Index: 48
view all 8 authors...
Results: More than half of respondents reported at least one, and one-fourth reported $2 categories of childhood exposures. We found a graded relationship between the number of categories of childhood exposure and each of the adult health risk behaviors and diseases that were studied (P , .001). Persons who had experienced four or more categories of childhood exposure, compared to those who had experienced none, had 4to 12-fold increased health risks for alcoholism, drug abuse, depression, and s...
6,010 CitationsSource
#1William H. DietzH-Index: 98
#3Ross C. BrownsonH-Index: 89
Last. Mary StoryH-Index: 114
view all 11 authors...
Source
#1Melissa M. AdamsH-Index: 21
#2Frank GreenbergH-Index: 4
Last. Godfrey P. OakleyH-Index: 30
view all 5 authors...
#1William H. DietzH-Index: 98
#2Ross C. BrownsonH-Index: 89
Last. Mary StoryH-Index: 114
view all 11 authors...
1 Citations
#1Vincent J. FelittiH-Index: 6
#2Robert F. AndaH-Index: 69
Last. James S. MarksH-Index: 48
view all 8 authors...
2 CitationsSource
5 CitationsSource
#1Susan D. Hillis (CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)H-Index: 35
#2Robert F. AndaH-Index: 69
Last. James S. MarksH-Index: 48
view all 7 authors...
Background: Few reports have addressed associations between family strengths during childhood and adolescent pregnancy and its consequences. We examined relationships among a number of childhood family strengths and adolescent pregnancy, risk behavior, and psychosocial consequences after adolescent pregnancy. Methods: Our retrospective cohort of 4648 women older than 18 years (mean age, 56 years) received primary care in San Diego, CA. Outcomes included adolescent pregnancy and psychosocial cons...
34 CitationsSource
#1Susan D. HillisH-Index: 35
#2Robert F. AndaH-Index: 69
Last. James S. MarksH-Index: 48
view all 6 authors...
Background:�Fewreportsha vead dressedas sociations� betweenfamilyst rengthsdu ringch ildhoodan dad oles- centpregnancyan dit sco nsequences.� Weex amined� relationshipsam onganu mberofch ildhoodfa mily� strengthsandad olescentpr egnancy,�ri skbe havior,�an d� psychosocialco nsequencesaf terad olescentpr egnancy. Methods:� Ourretrospectiveco hortof� 46 48� wo men� olderthan�18�ye ars�(m eanag e,�56�ye ars)�re ceivedpr imary� careinSanDi ego,�CA .�Ou tcomesin cludedad olescent� pregnancyan dps ych...
#1Janet L. CollinsH-Index: 26
#2James S. MarksH-Index: 48
Last. Jeffrey P. KoplanH-Index: 32
view all 3 authors...
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) has entered its 20th year — at the crossroads between adolescence and adulthood. As the 3 directors of the center to date, we offer our perspective on its developmental path and on the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead.
19 Citations
#1Stephen B. Thacker (CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)H-Index: 43
#2Donna F. StroupH-Index: 32
Last. Julie L. GerberdingH-Index: 42
view all 6 authors...
Allocation of public health resources should be based, where feasible, on objective assessments of health status, burden of disease, injury, and disability, their preventability, and related costs. In this article, we first analyze traditional measures of the public's health that address the burden of disease and disability and associated costs. Second, we discuss activities that are essential to protecting the public's health but whose impact is difficult to measure. Third, we propose general c...
68 CitationsSource
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