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Christopher D. Wilson
National Marine Fisheries Service
OceanographyPollockEcho soundingFisheryBiology
56Publications
16H-index
713Citations
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Publications 57
Newest
#1Henry P. HuntingtonH-Index: 32
#2Seth L. Danielson (UAF: University of Alaska Fairbanks)H-Index: 22
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The highly productive northern Bering and Chukchi marine shelf ecosystem has long been dominated by strong seasonality in sea-ice and water temperatures. Extremely warm conditions from 2017 into 2019—including loss of ice cover across portions of the region in all three winters—were a marked change even from other recent warm years. Biological indicators suggest that this change of state could alter ecosystem structure and function. Here, we report observations of key physical drivers, biologica...
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#1Sarah Stienessen (NMFS: National Marine Fisheries Service)H-Index: 5
#2Christopher D. Wilson (NMFS: National Marine Fisheries Service)H-Index: 16
Last. Julia K. Parrish (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 30
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Size and shape patterns of fish groups are collective outcomes of interactions among members. Consequently, group-level patterns are often affected when any member responds to changes in their internal state, external state, and environment. To determine how groups of fish respond to components of their physical and ecological environment, and whether the response is influenced by a component of their external state (i.e., fish age), we used a multibeam system to collect three-dimensional groupi...
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#1Christopher Bassett (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 1
#2Alex De Robertis (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 20
Last. Christopher D. Wilson (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 16
view all 3 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Alex De Robertis (NMFS: National Marine Fisheries Service)H-Index: 20
#2Robert Levine (NMFS: National Marine Fisheries Service)H-Index: 1
Last. Christopher D. Wilson (NMFS: National Marine Fisheries Service)H-Index: 16
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A small number of stationary echosounders have the potential to produce abundance indices where fish repeatedly occupy localized areas (e.g., spawning grounds). To investigate this possibility, we deployed three trawl-resistant moorings with a newly-designed autonomous echosounder for ~85 days during the walleye pollock spawning season in Shelikof Strait, Alaska. Backscatter observed from the moorings was highly correlated with ship-based acoustic surveys, suggesting that the mooring observation...
3 CitationsSource
#1Alex De Robertis (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 20
#2Kevin Taylor (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 3
Last. Christopher D. Wilson (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 16
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Abstract Acoustic-trawl (AT) survey methods are widely used to estimate the abundance and distribution of pelagic organisms. This technique relies on estimates of size and species composition from trawl catches along with estimates of the acoustic properties of these animals to convert measurements of acoustic backscatter into animal abundance. However, trawls are selective samplers, and if the catch does not represent the size and species composition of the animals in the acoustic beam the resu...
10 CitationsSource
#1Alex De Robertis (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 20
#2Kevin Taylor (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 3
Last. Edward V. Farley (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 13
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Abstract We conducted acoustic-trawl (AT) surveys of the northern Bering and Chukchi Seas during ice-free periods in 2012 and 2013. The mixed species assemblages in the study area required refinement of standard AT survey methods, and adjustment of trawl catches for the effects of trawl selectivity. Sensitivity analyses indicate that the AT abundance estimates are relatively robust to the assumptions of the analysis. These surveys indicate that midwater fishes are dominated by age-0 Arctic cod (...
18 CitationsSource
Acoustic-trawl surveys rely on a combination of backscatter measured with echosounders and species composition data from trawls to apportion the backscatter to different species and size classes. Narrowband echosounders have been widely used in this context for decades. Multi-frequency analysis of narrowband echosounder data has been shown to be effective for discriminating between diverse taxa (e.g., euphausiids vs. swimbladdered fishes) but distinguishing morphologically similar species (e.g.,...
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#1Mathieu Woillez (NMFS: National Marine Fisheries Service)H-Index: 12
#2Paul D. Walline (NMFS: National Marine Fisheries Service)H-Index: 4
Last. André E. Punt (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 51
view all 6 authors...
4 CitationsSource
#1Jodi L Pirtle (UNH: University of New Hampshire)H-Index: 3
#2Thomas C. Weber (UNH: University of New Hampshire)H-Index: 17
Last. Christopher N. Rooper (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)H-Index: 9
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Abstract Groundfish that associate with rugged seafloor types are difficult to assess with bottom-trawl sampling gear. Simrad ME70 multibeam echosounder (MBES) data and video imagery were collected to characterize trawlable and untrawlable areas, and to ultimately improve efforts to determine habitat-specific groundfish biomass. The data were collected during two acoustic-trawl surveys of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) during 2011 and 2012 by NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC) researchers. MB...
9 CitationsSource
#1Thomas C. Weber (UNH: University of New Hampshire)H-Index: 17
Last. Christopher D. WilsonH-Index: 16
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Rockfishes (Sebastes spp.) tend to aggregate near rocky, cobble, or generally rugged areas that are difficult to survey with bottom trawls, and evidence indicates that assemblages of rockfish species may differ between areas accessible to trawling and those areas that are not. Consequently, it is important to determine grounds that are trawlable or untrawlable so that the areas where trawl survey results should be applied are accurately identified. To this end, we used multibeam echosounder data...
2 CitationsSource
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