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Emily J. Flies
University of Tasmania
16Publications
4H-index
54Citations
Publications 16
Newest
#1Emily J. Flies (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 4
#2Suzanne Mavoa (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 20
Last.Jessie C. Buettel (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 3
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Abstract Background Cities are home to over half the global population; that proportion is expected to rise to 70% by mid-century. The urban environment differs greatly from that in which humans evolved, with potentially important consequences for health. Rates for allergic, inflammatory and auto-immune diseases appear to rise with urbanization and be higher in the more urbanized nations of the world which has led some to suggest that cities promote the occurrence of these diseases. However, the...
#1Hak Kan Lai (University of Auckland)H-Index: 13
#2Emily J. Flies (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 4
Last.Alistair Woodward (University of Auckland)H-Index: 37
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Last.Emily J. FliesH-Index: 4
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Ross River virus is Australia's most common mosquito-borne disease. It infects around 4,000 people a year and, despite being named after a river in North Queensland, is found in all states and territories, including Tasmania. While the disease isn't fatal, it can cause debilitating joint pain, swelling and fatigue lasting weeks or even months. It can leave sufferers unable to work or look after children, and is estimated to cost the economy A2. 7 to A.6 million each year. There is no treatmen...
#1Emily J. Flies (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 4
Last.Philip Weinstein (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 61
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Current evidence suggests that biodiverse environmental microbiomes contribute positively to human health and could account for known associations between urban green space and improved health. We summarise the state of knowledge that could inform the development of healthy urban microbiome initiatives (HUMI) to re-connect urban populations to biodiverse microbial communities.
#1Emily J. Flies (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 4
#2Barry W. Brook (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 55
Last.Jessie C. Buettel (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 3
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Predicting future food demand is a critical step for formulating the agricultural, economic and conservation policies required to feed over 9 billion people by 2050 while doing minimal harm to the environment. However, published future food demand estimates range substantially, making it difficult to determine optimal policies. Here we present a systematic review of the food demand literature - including a meta-analysis of papers reporting average global food demand predictions - and test the ef...
#1Jessie C. Buettel (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 3
#2Barry W. Brook (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 55
Last.Emily J. Flies (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 4
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We present a case study whereby ecological research on fallen trees in forest plots was advanced by a collaboration with astronomers working on the vector fields of stars and gas, and we propose a framework by which such novel collaborations can progress.
#1Emily J. Flies (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 4
#2Colleen L. Lau (National Health and Medical Research Council)H-Index: 14
Last.Philip Weinstein (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 61
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Ross River virus (RRV) is endemic to Australia and Papua New Guinea, with marsupials (especially macropods) as the primary reservoir hosts. Its geographic range was thought to be limited by the distribution of reservoir hosts, but recent evidence suggests that the virus can circulate endemically in the Pacific Islands, where marsupials are absent. RRV therefore has the potential for wider emergence because mammalian diversity in the Pacific Islands is limited and the possible species that have b...
#1Emily J. Flies (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 4
#2Philip Weinstein (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 61
Last.Craig R. Williams (UniSA: University of South Australia)H-Index: 22
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Summary: We find that the spatial scale/aggregation of an analysis influences the apparent importance of ecological drivers of arboviral (Ross River virus) disease; we urge future epidemiological studies to include multiple spatial scales for a more complete picture of disease drivers. Background: Zoonotic vector-borne disease prevalence is affected by vector, human and reservoir host factors, which are influenced by habitat and climate; these five components interact on microhabitat to landscap...
Nearly a decade ago sufficient evidence of climate change impacts on human health existed that The Lancet named climate change "the biggest global health threat of the 21st century" (Costello et al 2009). This important book provides the first in-depth critique of how and why climate change will impact allergic disease. Some sections of the book are dense and occasionally authors slip into jargon but generally, the book is an enjoyable and informative read for anyone with a college-level educati...
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