Match!
Jadwiga Leigh
Lancaster University
SociologySocial workChild protectionPublic relationsSocial psychology
36Publications
5H-index
82Citations
What is this?
Publications 36
Newest
#1Jadwiga Leigh (Lancaster University)H-Index: 5
#2Tom DisneyH-Index: 5
Last. Tarsem Singh Cooner (University of Birmingham)H-Index: 6
view all 6 authors...
Whilst the empirical process of research highlights substantive findings, understanding the methodological approach in which access is gained and sustained on field sites is also an integral part of the data. Gaining access in ethnographic studies, in particular, is a complex task which requires researchers to continually negotiate systems and processes in order that they may reflect on the socially embedded practices of their chosen fields. However once the researchers are accepted, the ethnogr...
Source
#1Jadwiga Leigh (Lancaster University)H-Index: 5
#2Sylvia Wilson (Lancaster University)
In this article, we draw on concepts of time, liminal space and narrative therapy to explore the interactions that we, the authors, engaged in before, during and after our sessions together. New Be...
Source
#1Jadwiga Leigh (Lancaster University)H-Index: 5
#2Lisa Morriss (Lancaster University)H-Index: 7
Last. Matthew Morriss (University of Salford)
view all 3 authors...
This article demonstrates that making art in conjunction with story-telling is a method which can elucidate the everyday working practices of social work practitioners. To date, the relationship between art and social workers has rarely been noted, in part because visual studies have not attended to the lived experiences of social workers. In this paper, we draw on an empirical study undertaken in England which invited social workers to use art to tell their stories of being a social worker and ...
Source
#1Harry Ferguson (University of Birmingham)H-Index: 23
#2Lisa Warwick (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 2
view all 7 authors...
Social work in the UK is preoccupied with what social workers cannot do due to having limited time to spend with service users. Yet remarkably little research has examined what social workers actually do, especially in long-term relationships. This paper draws from an ethnographic study of two social work departments in England that spent 15 months observing practice and organisational life. Our findings show that social work some of the time has a significant amount of involvement with some ser...
2 CitationsSource
#1Jadwiga Leigh (Lancaster University)H-Index: 5
Source
#1Harry FergusonH-Index: 23
#2Jadwiga LeighH-Index: 5
Last. Gillian PlumridgeH-Index: 7
view all 7 authors...
Research into social work and child protection has begun to observe practice to find out what social workers actually do, however no such ethnographic research has been done into long-term practice. This paper outlines and analyses the methods used in a study of long-term social work and child protection practice. Researchers spent 15 months embedded in two social work departments observing organisational practices, culture, and staff supervision. We also regularly observed social worker’s encou...
Source
#1Jadwiga Leigh (Lancaster University)H-Index: 5
Source
#1Jadwiga LeighH-Index: 5
#1Jadwiga Leigh (Lancaster University)H-Index: 5
#2Liz Beddoe (University of Auckland)H-Index: 15
Last. Emily Keddell (University of Otago)H-Index: 10
view all 3 authors...
This article examines how the term disguised compliance first emerged and developed into the popular catchphrase that is used in practice today. Using critical discourse analysis, we explore how language affects practice and how social workers draw on a predetermined concept to rationalise concerns relating to parental resistance. We contend that concepts such as disguised compliance are misleading as they do not improve social workers’ abilities in detecting resistance or compliance. Instead, w...
Source
#1Tom Disney (Northumbria University)H-Index: 5
#2Lisa Warwick (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 2
Last. Tess Osborne (University of Birmingham)H-Index: 2
view all 8 authors...
Social work is an inherently mobile and spatial profession; child protection social workers travel to meet families in diverse contexts, such as families' homes, schools, court and many more. However, rising bureaucracy, managerialism and workloads are all combining to push social workers to complete increasing volumes of work outside their working hours. Such concerns lead to the perception that social workers are increasingly immobilised, finding themselves desk-bound and required to spend muc...
1 CitationsSource
1234