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Stephen B. Broomell
Carnegie Mellon University
26Publications
10H-index
723Citations
Publications 26
Newest
#1Baruch Fischhoff (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 84
#2Stephen B. Broomell (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 10
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#1Stephen B. Broomell (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 10
#2Sabina J. Sloman (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 1
Last.Julia Chelen (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 1
view all 4 authors...
Lee et al. (Computational Brain & Behavior, 2019) discuss ways to improve research practices for evaluating quantitative cognitive models. We propose the additional research practices of careful consideration, documentation, and analysis of the stimuli used to generate responses. Current modeling practice too often fails to acknowledge how the stimuli used to generate responses from research participants can influence the results of model comparisons. We recommend researchers (a) disclose how th...
1 CitationsSource
#1Eric P. Silver (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)
#2Stephen B. Broomell (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 10
Last.Tamar Krishnamurti (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 1
view all 5 authors...
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#1Barry Dewitt (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 4
#2Baruch Fischhoff (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 84
Last.Janel Hanmer (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 13
view all 6 authors...
Background. Researchers often justify excluding some responses in studies eliciting valuations of health states as not representing respondents’ true preferences. Here, we examine the effects of ap...
Source
#1Barry Dewitt (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 4
#2Baruch Fischhoff (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 84
Last.Janel Hanmer (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 13
view all 6 authors...
Background. In a systematic review, Engel et al. found large variation in the exclusion criteria used to remove responses held not to represent genuine preferences in health state valuation studies...
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AbstractUnlike the scientific definition of global warming (GW), public discussion often links the existence of GW to daily temperatures rather than long-term averages. Previous research found that daily weather is perceived as personal experiences with GW. Additionally, prior beliefs about GW can affect interpretations of such experiences as evidence for the existence of GW. However, previous studies demonstrating that beliefs affect interpretations of experiences were based on correlational de...
5 CitationsSource
#1Adam J. L. Harris (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 16
#2Han-Hui Por (Fordham University)H-Index: 8
Last.Stephen B. Broomell (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 10
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Abstract Verbal probability expressions (VPEs) are frequently used to communicate risk and uncertainty. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change attempts to standardise the use and interpretation of these expressions through a translation scale of numerical ranges to VPEs. A common issue in interpreting VPEs is the tendency for individuals to interpret VPEs around the midpoint of the scale (i.e. around 50%). Previous research has shown that compliance with the IPCC’s standards can be improv...
5 CitationsSource
#1Stephen B. Broomell (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 10
#2Patrick Bodilly Kane (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 3
8 CitationsSource
#1Richard H. MossH-Index: 9
#2Linda O. MearnsH-Index: 54
Last.Justin J. HenriquesH-Index: 6
view all 14 authors...
Abstract : The Department of Defense (DoD) has identified climate change as a risk to its infrastructure and is seeking to develop efficient and effective processes to assess the vulnerability of its assets to this risk. Responding to this need, we developed, piloted, and evaluated an approach for vulnerability assessment keyed to DoD decision-making needs and processes at multiple organizations levels. We developed and tested methods for use in an overall assessment framework, and a process for...
#1Barry Dewitt (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 4
#2Baruch Fischhoff (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 84
Last.Stephen B. Broomell (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 10
view all 4 authors...
Lay judgments of environmental risks are central to both immediate decisions (e.g., taking shelter from a storm) and long-term ones (e.g., building in locations subject to storm surges). Using methods from quantitative psychology, we provide a general approach to studying lay perceptions of environmental risks. As a first application of these methods, we investigate a setting where lay decisions have not taken full advantage of advances in natural science understanding: tornado forecasts in the ...
5 CitationsSource
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