Match!
E. R. Jasper Wubs
Wageningen University and Research Centre
15Publications
8H-index
266Citations
Publications 17
Newest
#1Julien PiquerayH-Index: 12
#2Valentin GilliauxH-Index: 1
Last.Grégory Mahy (Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech)H-Index: 28
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Since the 1950s, agriculture has intensified drastically, which has led to a significant biodiversity decline on arable lands. This decline was especially dramatic for segetal plant species, the specialist species of cereal fields. Due to the low population density and poor dispersal abilities of many segetal species, the recovery of species-rich fields may fail even though the environmental conditions are suitable. Therefore, conservation efforts including active restoration measures a...
Source
#1Judith Sitters (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)H-Index: 6
#2E. R. Jasper Wubs (ETH Zurich)H-Index: 8
Last.Elsa E. Cleland (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 47
view all 30 authors...
Source
#1Dan Xiong (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
#2Cunzheng Wei (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 4
Last.Xingguo Han (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 47
view all 9 authors...
Aim: Increasing aridity under global change is predicted to have a profound impact on the structure and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, yet we have a poor understanding of how belowground communities respond. In order to understand the longer term responses of different trophic levels in the soil food web to increasing aridity, we investigated the abundance, richness and community similarity of the soil nematode community along a 3,200 km aridity gradient. Location: A transect across semi...
Source
#1G. F. (Ciska) VeenH-Index: 15
#2E. R. Jasper Wubs (ETH Zurich)H-Index: 8
Last.Louise E. M. Vet (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 61
view all 19 authors...
Interactions between aboveground and belowground organisms are important drivers of plant growth and performance in natural ecosystems. Making practical use of such above-belowground biotic interactions offers important opportunities for enhancing the sustainability of agriculture, as it could favour crop growth, nutrient supply, and defence against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the operation of above- and belowground organisms at different spatial and temporal scales provides important ...
Source
#1E. R. Jasper Wubs (ETH Zurich)H-Index: 8
#2Wim H. van der Putten (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 62
Last.T. Martijn Bezemer (LEI: Leiden University)H-Index: 39
view all 7 authors...
Recent demonstrations of the role of plant–soil biota interactions have challenged the conventional view that vegetation changes are mainly driven by changing abiotic conditions. However, while this concept has been validated under natural conditions, our understanding of the long‐term consequences of plant–soil interactions for above‐belowground community assembly is restricted to mathematical and conceptual model projections. Here, we demonstrate experimentally that one‐time additions of soil ...
1 CitationsSource
#1E. R. Jasper Wubs (James Hutton Institute)H-Index: 8
#2Sarah J. Woodin (Aberd.: University of Aberdeen)H-Index: 28
Last.René van der Wal (Aberd.: University of Aberdeen)H-Index: 34
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Snow strongly affects ecosystem functioning in alpine environments with potential carry-over effects outside of snow periods. However, it is unclear whether changes in snow cover affect microbial community functioning in summer. In a field experiment, we tested whether manipulation of snow cover affected the functional capabilities of the microbial community either directly, or indirectly through concomitant changes in the vegetation. While 23 years of differential snow depth and persis...
1 CitationsSource
#1E. R. Jasper Wubs (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 8
#2T. Martijn Bezemer (LEI: Leiden University)H-Index: 39
Plant–soil feedbacks (PSF) strongly influence plant performance. However, to what extent these PSF effects are persistent in the soil and how they are altered by species that subsequently condition the soil is unclear. Here we test how conspecific and heterospecific soil-conditioning effects interact across different soil-conditioning phases. We conducted a fully factorial glasshouse experiment where six plant species conditioned soils in two consecutive phases and measured the performance of Ja...
9 CitationsSource
#1E. R. Jasper Wubs (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 8
#2T. Martijn Bezemer (LEI: Leiden University)H-Index: 39
1.Plant-soil feedback (PSF) has been identified as a key driver of local plant diversity and evenness in competitive communities. However, while it has been shown that spatial PSF heterogeneity can alter plant performance and competitive interactions, there is no proof of principle that spatial PSF heterogeneity enhances community diversity. 2.Using a grassland model system we separated two aspects of spatial heterogeneity: the number of species conditioning the soil and spatial distribution of ...
6 CitationsSource
#2Stefan Geisen (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 8
Last.Paolina GarbevaH-Index: 24
view all 6 authors...
Protists are major predators of bacteria in soils. However, it remains unknown how protists sense their prey in this highly complex environment. Here, we investigated whether volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of six phylogenetic distinct soil bacteria affect the performance of three different soil protists and how that relates to direct feeding interactions. We observed that most bacteria affected protist activity by VOCs. However, the response of protists to the VOCs was strongly dependent on b...
24 CitationsSource
#1E. R. Jasper Wubs (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 8
#2Wim H. van der Putten (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 62
Last.T. Martijn BezemerH-Index: 39
view all 4 authors...
Intensive agricultural activity can degrade ecosystems, and restoration takes decades. This field study shows that soil inocula promote ecosystem restoration, and different inocula (such as grassland/heathland) can steer restoration towards different targets.
100 CitationsSource
12