Match!
Guy-Franck Richard
Centre national de la recherche scientifique
44Publications
23H-index
3,492Citations
Publications 44
Newest
#1Lucie Poggi (University of Paris)H-Index: 2
#2Bruno DumasH-Index: 1
Last.Guy-Franck Richard (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 23
view all 3 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Guy-Franck Richard (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 23
Source
#1David Viterbo (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
#2Guy-Franck Richard (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 23
Source
#1Lucie Poggi (Pasteur Institute)
Last.Guy-Franck Richard (Pasteur Institute)H-Index: 23
view all 5 authors...
Microsatellite expansions are the cause of more than 20 neurological or developmental human disorders. Shortening expanded repeats using specific DNA endonucleases may be envisioned as a gene editing approach. Here, a new assay was developed to test several CRISPR-Cas nucleases on microsatellites involved in human diseases, by measuring at the same time double-strand break rates, DNA end resection and homologous recombination efficacy. Broad variations in nuclease performances were detected on a...
Source
#1Valentine MosbachH-Index: 3
#2David Viterbo (Pasteur Institute)H-Index: 2
Last.Guy-Franck Richard (Pasteur Institute)H-Index: 23
view all 6 authors...
Microsatellites are short tandem repeats, ubiquitous in all eukaryotes and represent 2% of the human genome. Among them, trinucleotide repeats are responsible for more than two dozen neurological and developmental disorders. Targeting microsatellites with dedicated DNA endonucleases could become a viable option for patients affected with dramatic neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we used the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 to induce a double-strand break within the expanded CTG repeat involved in m...
Source
#1Valentine Mosbach (Pasteur Institute)H-Index: 2
#2Lucie PoggiH-Index: 2
Last.Guy-Franck Richard (Pasteur Institute)H-Index: 23
view all 3 authors...
Trinucleotide repeats are a particular class of microsatellites whose large expansions are responsible for at least two dozen human neurological and developmental disorders. Slippage of the two complementary DNA strands during replication, homologous recombination or DNA repair is generally accepted as a mechanism leading to repeat length changes, creating expansions and contractions of the repeat tract. The present review focuses on recent developments on double-strand break repair involving tr...
7 CitationsSource
#1Valentine Mosbach (Pasteur Institute)H-Index: 3
#2Lucie Poggi (Pasteur Institute)H-Index: 2
Last.Guy-Franck Richard (Pasteur Institute)H-Index: 23
view all 5 authors...
Trinucleotide repeat expansions involving CTG/CAG triplets are responsible for several neurodegenerative disorders, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington’s disease. Because expansions trigger the disease, contracting repeat length could be a possible approach to gene therapy for these disorders. Here, we show that a TALEN-induced double-strand break was very efficient at contracting expanded CTG repeats in yeast. We show that RAD51, POL32, and DNL4 are dispensable for double-strand break r...
9 CitationsSource
#1David Viterbo (Pasteur Institute)H-Index: 2
#2Astrid Marchal (Pasteur Institute)H-Index: 1
Last.Guy-Franck Richard (Pasteur Institute)H-Index: 23
view all 6 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Jennifer H.G. Nguyen (Tufts University)H-Index: 2
#2David Viterbo (UPMC: Pierre-and-Marie-Curie University)H-Index: 1
Last.Catherine H. Freudenreich (Tufts University)H-Index: 23
view all 7 authors...
11 CitationsSource
#1Guy-Franck Richard (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 23
Trinucleotide repeat expansions are involved in more than two dozen neurological and developmental disorders. Conventional therapeutic approaches aimed at regulating the expression level of affected genes, which rely on drugs, oligonucleotides, and/or transgenes, have met with only limited success so far. An alternative approach is to shorten repeats to non-pathological lengths using highly specific nucleases. Here, I review early experiments using meganucleases, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN), and...
19 CitationsSource
12345