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Peter Arcese
University of British Columbia
EcologyInbreedingMelospizaPopulationBiology
171Publications
49H-index
8,297Citations
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Publications 176
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#1Cora L. Skaien (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 1
#2Peter Arcese (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 49
Spatial variation in the occurrence of browsing ungulates can drive local adaptation in plant traits but also lead to trade-offs among traits potentially enhancing competitive ability versus resistance or tolerance to browsing. Plectritis congesta populations co-occurring on islands with and without ungulates offer striking examples of population-level variation in traits, such as plant height and fruit morphology, which may also affect fitness. We monitored split-plot common gardens exposed to ...
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#1Peter ArceseH-Index: 49
#2Mark K. SoggeH-Index: 1
Last. Michael A. PattenH-Index: 25
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#1Jane M. Reid (Aberd.: University of Aberdeen)H-Index: 33
#2Peter Arcese (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 49
Quantifying additive genetic variances and cross-sex covariances in reproductive traits, and identifying processes that shape and maintain such (co)variances, is central to understanding the evolutionary dynamics of reproductive systems. Gene flow resulting from among-population dispersal could substantially alter additive genetic variances and covariances in key traits in recipient populations, thereby altering forms of sexual conflict, indirect selection, and evolutionary responses. However, t...
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#1Elizabeth A. Gow (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 9
#1Elizabeth A. Gow (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 1
Last. Jane M. Reid (Aberd.: University of Aberdeen)H-Index: 33
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Inclusive fitness theory predicts that parental care will vary with relatedness between potentially caring parents and offspring, potentially shaping mating system evolution. Systems with extra-pai...
1 CitationsSource
#1Elizabeth A. GowH-Index: 1
#2Peter ArceseH-Index: 49
Last. Jane M. ReidH-Index: 33
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#1Amanda D. Rodewald (Cornell University)H-Index: 32
#2Matt Strimas-Mackey (Cornell University)
Last. Peter Arcese (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 49
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Decision-support tools are commonly used to maximize return on investments (ROI) in conservation. We evaluated how the relative value of information on biodiversity features and land cost varied with data structure and variability, attributes of focal species and conservation targets, and habitat suitability thresholds for contrasting bird communities in the Pacific Northwest of North America. Specifically, we used spatial distribution maps for 20 bird species, land values, and an integer linear...
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#1S. Wilson (Carleton University)H-Index: 1
#2Richard Schuster (Carleton University)H-Index: 9
Last. Peter Arcese (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 49
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Abstract Stemming biodiversity loss requires strategic conservation guided by well articulated targets, whether they be proactive (e.g., protect biodiverse areas) or reactive (e.g., protect threatened species). Both types of targets can be effective, but there are trade-offs, especially for broadly distributed taxa such as migratory species, a group for which conservation has been challenged by limited knowledge of distributions throughout the annual cycle. We combined spatiotemporal distributio...
1 CitationsSource
#1Richard Schuster (Carleton University)H-Index: 9
#2Ryan R. Germain (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 10
Last. Peter Arcese (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 49
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Abstract Declines in global biodiversity due to land conversion and habitat loss are driving a ‘Sixth Mass Extinction’ and many countries fall short of meeting even nominal targets for land protection. We explored how such shortfalls in Australia, Brazil and Canada might be addressed by enhancing partnerships between Indigenous communities and other government agencies that recognize and reward the existing contributions of Indigenous-managed lands to global biodiversity conservation, and their ...
3 CitationsSource
#1Jennifer Walsh (Cornell University)H-Index: 8
#2Phred M. Benham (UM: University of Montana)H-Index: 7
Last. Irby J. Lovette (Cornell University)H-Index: 45
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: Theory suggests that different taxa having colonized a similar, challenging environment will show parallel or lineage-specific adaptations to shared selection pressures, but empirical examples of parallel evolution in independent taxa are exceedingly rare. We employed comparative genomics to identify parallel and lineage-specific responses to selection within and among four species of North American sparrows that represent four independent, post-Pleistocene colonization events by an ancestral,...
2 CitationsSource
#1Micah N. Scholer (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 2
#2Peter Arcese (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 49
Last. Jill E. Jankowski (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 13
view all 5 authors...
Life‐history theory postulates that physiological traits, such as energy metabolism, can be understood in terms of allocation trade‐offs between self‐maintenance and reproduction over an organism's life span, and data show that metabolic intensity and survival vary inversely with latitude, with tropical birds exhibiting a “slow” pace of life relative to temperature species. However, tropical regions harbour strong environmental gradients of their own, and it remains to be shown whether similar l...
2 CitationsSource
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